Smartphones. The old days.

I finally raided my “special cupboard” and look. Look at what greeted me. Anyone remember these?

Smartphones. The old days.

I know some of you might recognise your favourites, but I’m going to start with the oldest one, on the left. It’s the Orange SPV, also known as the HTC Canary. This was released in November 2002 and was the catalyst for the creation of this site.

It was a traditional “Candybar” design with a Texus Instrument OMAP 710 CPU running at a blazing 132 MHz. Inside you could put a full-sized SD card and it had a 176×220 screen. It ran Microsoft Smartphone 2002, which was basically a non-touch version of the Pocket PC 2002 operating system.

Smartphones. The old days.

Here’s a look at it (almost) in action. I need to dig out a SIM card for it to do a bit more, but you can have a good look around it here..

Other phones in the photo include the Orange SPV E100 and E200, which had something called a “camera” in the back (this was a big leap for smartphones) and there’s also the flip-tastic Motorola MPx200 plus the Orange SPV M2000, which has a slide-out keyboard. I’m going to get you a hands-on video of each of these over the coming days, so don’t forget to follow us on Twitter to see the next instalment 🙂

Smartphones. The old days.

Smartphones. The old days.

Smartphones. The old days.

Smartphones. The old days.

But first, back to that Orange SPV. If you want to read more about it then look at our earlier story and the follow-up piece where we show you that plug-in camera!

Right, I’m off to try an find a SIM card that it’ll accept so that I can show you a bit more of the interface.

The post Smartphones. The old days. is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News
  • McDonald's Tests Mobile Ordering Before National Rollout

    McDonald’s has started testing mobile order-and-pay after acknowledging the ordering process in its restaurants can be “stressful.”

    The company says it will gather feedback from the test before launching the option nationally toward the end of the year. It says mobile order-and-pay is now available at 29 stores in Monterey and Salinas, California, and will expand to 51 more locations in Spokane, Washington, next week.

    The rollout comes as customers increasingly seek out convenience through options like online ordering or delivery. McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook has noted the initial stages of visiting can be “stressful,” and the chain is making changes to improve the overall customer experience. That includes introducing ordering kiosks, which McDonald’s says can help ease lines at the counter and improve the accuracy of orders — another frustration for customers. Easterbrook has also talked about the potential of delivery.

    With its mobile order-and-pay option, McDonald’s says customers place an order on its app then go to a restaurant and “check in” to select how they want to get their food. That could be at the counter, in the drive-thru, or with curbside delivery, where an employee brings out orders to a designated space. Orders are prepared once customers check in at the restaurant.

    Starbucks has already found success using its mobile app and loyalty program to encourage people to visit more often and spend more when they do. The chain has also said its mobile order-and-pay option was so popular that it caused congestion at pick-up counters last year, leading some customers who walked into stores to leave without buying anything. Starbucks said it is working on fixing those issues.

    It’s not clear whether McDonald’s will be able to get the same level of usage for its mobile app and order-and-pay option. Since coffee tends to be more of a daily habit,…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Telecom Policy Tilts in Favor of Industry Under Trump's FCC

    Trumpism is slowly taking hold on your phone and computer, as the Federal Communications Commission starts rolling back measures that upset the phone and cable industries.

    Consumer advocates complain that hard-fought protections on privacy and competition are at risk, though the new regime says consumers win if businesses have incentives to invest.

    The changes are small and easily overlooked. But they’re the first shots in what could turn into a full-fledged war over Obama-era “net neutrality” rules, which were designed to keep phone and cable giants from favoring their own internet services and apps.

    “Death by a thousand cuts is a constantly overused cliche, but that’s sort of what they’re aiming for right now,” said Matt Wood, the policy director of consumer group Free Press, referring to the Republicans now in power at the FCC.

    Death to Net Neutrality

    It’s no secret President Donald Trump’s hand-picked FCC chief, Ajit Pai, wants to cut regulations that he believes are holding back faster, cheaper internet.

    Pai takes special aim at net neutrality rules, which regulate broadband as a utility and bar providers from playing favorites by offering speedier access to, say, their own streaming-video services. Pai considers these rules a mistake that slows investment in internet infrastructure. His goal is to expand internet access, especially in rural areas where choices are limited.

    But an aggressive overhaul of net neutrality could be politically and legally difficult. For a telecom policy, net neutrality is popular with consumers, drawing attention from comedian John Oliver and spurring people to flood the FCC with roughly 4 million comments (not all in support, of course). A federal appeals court upheld the rules in June.

    This may explain why the FCC has so far opted for a piecemeal attack — an approach that may continue for a while.

    Nibbling Around the Edges

    A broad attack on the landmark 2015…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Google Hopes To Improve Search Quality with 'Offensive' Flag

    Google is trying to improve the quality of its search results by directing review teams to flag content that might come across as upsetting or offensive.

    With the change, content with racial slurs could now get flagged under a new category called “upsetting-offensive.” So could content that promotes hate or violence against a specific group of people based on gender, race or other criteria.

    While flagging something doesn’t directly affect the search results themselves, it’s used to tweak the company’s software so that better content ranks higher. This approach might, for instance, push down content that is inaccurate or has other questionable attributes, thereby giving prominence to trustworthy sources.

    The review teams — comprised of contractors known as “quality raters” — already comb through websites and other content to flag questionable items such as pornography. Google added “upsetting-offensive” in its latest guidelines for quality raters. Google declined to comment on the changes, which were reported in the blog Search Engine Land and elsewhere.

    The guidelines, which run 160 pages, are an interesting look into how Google ranks the quality of its search results. For instance, it gives examples of “high-quality” pages, such as the home page of a newspaper that has “won seven Pulitzer Prize awards,” and “low-quality” pages, such as an article that includes “many grammar and punctuation errors.”

    The guidelines cite an example of “Holocaust history” as a search query. A resulting website listing “Top 10 reasons why the holocaust didn’t happen” would get flagged.

    The new “upsetting-offensive” flag instructs quality raters to “flag to all web results that contain upsetting or offensive content from the perspective of users in your locale, even if the result satisfies the user intent.” So even if the results are what the person searched for, such as white supremacist websites, they could still get flagged. But it doesn’t…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Review: Blu Life One X2 Mini

    This inexpensive, unlocked Android smartphone is smaller than its predecessor and yet better in many ways. The Blu Life One X2 Mini is a fine little phone for those who prefer or need to change networks often. It runs Marshmallow and manages to include a 5-inch, full HD screen, Snapdragon processor, and 13-megapixel camera for less than two Benjamins. Here is Phone Scoop’s in-depth review.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Blu Shows Off the Unlocked Life One X2 Mini

    Blu today announced the Life One X2 Mini, a smaller version of the One X2 that carries over the basic design and fingerprint reader of the original. The Mini sports a 5-inch full HD screen, Snapdragon 430 processor with 4 GB of RAM, 64 GB of storage, and support for memory cards. The main camera has a 13-megapixel sensor with pro, night, and sport modes, while the rear camera has an 8-megapixel sensor with wide-angle selfie mode and selfie light. Other features of the phone include Android 6 Marshmallow, microUSB, Bluetooth, GPS, and WiFi. The phone is sold unlocked with LTE support for AT&T/Cricket Wireless and T-Mobile/MetroPCS. The Blu Life One X2 Mini is available today from Amazon.com for $180.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Lenovo P2 – review

    Lenovo may not be the biggest player out there, but they are at least trying to make a difference in an area others struggle, and that is battery life.

    Let me say this straight away. The Lenovo P2 has a beast of a battery, cramming in a massive 5100 mAh capacity pack in a phone just 8.3 mm thick and weighs 177 grammes.

    Lenovo bought Motorola from Google a while ago and brought their experience in smartphones and it shows with the P2.

    Hardware

    Looking at the front of the Lenovo P2, you get a pretty standard design. Picture a large black screen with a front facing camera, earpiece and a single home button. At least it is an actual button, not a touch capacitive one like the iPhone which some people love, some hate.

    Lenovo P2   review

    Lenovo P2   review

    The camera up top is a 5 megapixel shooter, capable of 1080p video if you like to vlog on the move. The quality is pretty good considering the overall cost of the device.

    The screen is a 5.5 inch Super AMOLED panel at 1080p resolution showing 401 ppi, and is a pleasure to use even. Though it isn’t 2k, you get decent contrast thanks to the screen technology, and this also improves battery performance.

    There is a fingerprint sensor included, and it is also a clickable button located just under the screen. In my testing, it sometimes took a few attempts to unlock the phone but was fast when it worked.

    Lenovo P2   review

    Turn to the back and you have a gunmetal colour metal finish with the 13-megapixel lens up top which records in up to 2k resolution and uses phase detection auto focus and a f2.0 aperture for decent overall photos in daylight conditions.

    Below the camera is a dual tone LED flash which helps boost lighting in poor conditions. It can also be used as a decent flashlight, something I find very handy.

    Lenovo P2   review

    Everything else on the back is just for information, such as the NFC logo, a large Lenovo brand and even the words ‘Manufactured by Motorola Mobility’.

    Over on the left-hand side, you have just a single slider switch, which as if you would even need it with such a large battery, activates ultra power saving mode. This cuts down all the extras, and just lets you call and text when you’re down to that last few % and panic kicks in.

    Lenovo P2   review

    Lenovo P2   review

    Flip over to the right, and you have a volume up and down combo and a power button used to put into standby or to switch on and off.

    At the top you have the 3.5mm headset jack, which although you might think is expected, so many new phones these days are removing it. Instead they make you rely on a Bluetooth connection.

    Lenovo P2   review

    Lenovo P2   review

    Turn to the bottom, and you have 2 speakers for audio/loudspeaker modes and these are very loud and clear. In between the 2 speakers, you have the Micro USB charging connection. No USB type C here, which was a surprise, but a pleasant one at that.

    The biggest selling point for the Lenovo P2 is that massive 5,100mAh capacity battery the company managed to include. For a phone this size that is pretty amazing!

    In my testing, I never ran out within a single day of use and that was not only for things like calls, texts and internet. It was also for a lot of Pokémon Go, which anyone playing knows how much battery it eats up normally.

    Performance wise you get a Snapdragon 625 octa-core processor, paired with 4GB RAM which is plenty for multitasking and heavy gaining. Whilst the Snapdragon 625 can’t compete with the more-beefy Sanpdragon 820 and higher variants, performance is more than adequate for most people.

    Storage comes in at 32 GB, with the option to add expandable memory via Micro SD cards if you need one.

    If you don’t need that extra storage then you can always add a second sim. Yes the Lenovo P2 supports dual SIM cards, so it will be perfect for someone who wants just one phone but requires both a work and personal SIM.

    Camera

    The camera on the back as mentioned is a 13-megapixel snapper with f2.0 aperture, giving you decent everyday photos if you get good lighting.

    Lenovo P2   review

    Switch into night mode, and things start to take a dip in qualit,y but for a lot of people will still find these decent enough to share online or social media.

    Here are some samples and screenshots of the camera interface.

    Lenovo P2   review

    Lenovo P2   review

    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review

    The video mode goes right up to 4k on the Lenovo P2. While not many people use 4k still, with YouTube now offering 4k playback this may not be important right now but will be down the line if you choose to buy one and keep it for a while.

    Software

    Lenovo has added a few handy little tweaks into their software, with the best one being the recording of conversations with a simple tap. It’s very handy if you need to listen back later on.

    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review
    Lenovo P2   review

    Other handy things include a yellow pages service for looking up when you need to call, and a built-in call and text blocker to stop those annoying scammers trying to get through to you.

    Conclusions

    Overall I had the Lenovo P2 in use for 2 weeks straight.

    Being someone who is on the phone most of the day for various things, battery performance is so important to me as well as camera quality.

    Thankfully the P2 did great on both fronts, giving me over a day of use and never having that worried feeling I may run out. On top of that, the camera actually captured some pretty impressive shots in daytime.

    What is really impressive is all this power and spec will only set you back £199 to buy on Three with no contract!

    If you are in the market for a decent Android-powered smartphone, and battery is key to your use then I have no hesitation in recommending the Lenovo P2.In fact would be more than happy to have as my only device.

    Great job Lenovo!

    The post Lenovo P2 – review is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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    Have you been watching the Walking Dead? Are you afraid of the so called Zombie Apocalypse? This house is for you! Remember the printer that can build a house in 24 hours? I guess the idea challenged this Ukrainian because he is claiming that he can also print a 3D house and can also finish […]
    Source: Mobile Magazine

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    Source: Mobile Magazine

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    Source: Mobile Magazine