Huawei's Honor Brand Rolls Out Beta Testing Program

Huawei hopes to tap into the feedback of power users in a way that will benefit U.S. consumers through the new Honor Beta program. The Honor Beta team will be able to test new features ahead of public release and provide feedback directly to Huawei’s R&D team. Those interested in the participating can apply via the Honor brand’s Facebook page. Huawei is looking for English speakers who live in the U.S. Huawei expects to review applications and then match them with specific opportunities for testing purposes. The company said those selected to participate may get to use software and hardware that’s not slated to reach the market for one to two years. “Honor will explore what U.S. consumers want and adapt products and strategy each step of the way,” said the company. “Honor can quickly evolve its products and strategy on a regional level. Honor Beta is one big step in preparing to lead the unlocked smartphone market of tomorrow.” The Honor Beta program is accepting submissions starting today.

Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

Huawei's Honor 8 Pro Packs Top Specs

Huawei today announced the Honor 8 Pro, a flagship handset for its Honor brand. The phone has specs similar to the Huawei P10, but it is much larger thanks to a 5.7-inch quad HD display and 4,000mAh battery. The phone is powered by Huawei’s octa-core Kirin 960 processor with 4 GB of RAM, 64 GB of storage, and a Mali GPU. Like many of Huawei’s recent handsets, the Honor 8 Pro includes two cameras on the rear, each rated at 12 megapixels, one that captures full color and one that captures monochrome. Special shooting modes include slow-motion, time-lapse, panorama, full manual, aperture, and more. The front camera has an 8-megapixel sensor and some of these same modes. The Honor 8 Pro runs Android 7 Nougat with EMUI 5.1. The phone includes Bluetooth, GPS, and WiFi, but LTE support is limited to Bands 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20, 38, and 40, making it only partially compatible with some U.S. LTE networks. The phone supports rapid charging and memory cards up to 128 GB. The Honor 8 Pro comes in blue, black, or gold for about $585. It will ship with a Cardboard-style VR viewer. Huawei said the phone will be made available in Europe beginning today.

Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

Honor 8 Pro hands-on

We had a play around with an Honor 8 Pro recently and were really impressed with the overall experience delivered by the device.

Honor 8 Pro hands on

We have a gallery here to feast your eyes on Honor’s latest flagship which starts shipping on April 20th. Full specs and thoughts about the announcement are here.

Honor 8 Pro hands on
Honor 8 Pro hands on
Honor 8 Pro hands on
Honor 8 Pro hands on
Honor 8 Pro hands on
Honor 8 Pro hands on
Honor 8 Pro hands on
Honor 8 Pro hands on
Honor 8 Pro hands on
Honor 8 Pro hands on

Do you have questions about it? Take to Twitter to ask our Chief Pixel Density Enthusiast what he thinks of it.

The post Honor 8 Pro hands-on is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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  • Honor 8 Pro Announced

    Honor have just announced their new flagship device: the Honor 8 Pro.

    Honor 8 Pro Announced

    The Honor 8 Pro has a sleek all-metal body design with rounded edges, a dual-camera setup that doesn’t protrude and a selection of colours to choose from which includes Midnight Black, Navy Blue and Platinum Gold.

    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced

    Honor 8 Pro Specifications:

    • 5.7″ QHD (1440×2560) LTPS IPS LCD display
    • HiSilicon Kirin 960 octa-core chipset with Mali-G71 MP8 GPU
    • 6GB RAM
    • 64GB internal storage (expandable with up to 256GB MicroSD)
    • EMUI 5.1 based Android Nougat (7.0)
    • Dual 12MP camera with phase detection and laser auto-focus
    • 8MP selfie camera
    • WLAN, Bluetooth 4.2 LE, NFC, Infrared, GPS/GLONASS/BDS
    • USB Type-C
    • 4000 mAh battery

    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced
    Honor 8 Pro Announced

    We got to play around with the Honor 8 Pro recently and managed to get a hands-on (in a pub, where else…). You can check it out here.

    The chipset, screen and GPU enable the Honor 8 to use Vulkan. What is Vulkan you ask? It’s an API for gaming and graphics that Android 7 supports given the right hardware. Essentially the Honor 8 Pro is made for VR gaming

    The Honor 8 Pro is under 7mm thick and does not have a camera bump. Essentially the device is marginally smaller than an iPhone 7 Plus while delivering a higher density and larger screen.

    So there you have it! Honor are back with a flagship which will certainly cause some ripples in the market: 6GB RAM and the capable chipset we have seen on the Huawei Mate 9 and P10. A quad high definition 5.7″ screen (Chief Pixel Density Enthusiast Approved) which is placed in an all-metal body ergonomically designed to fit nicely in the hand.

    This significant bump in specifications and hardware capability paired with EMUI 5.1 based on Android 7 deservedly earn the device the “Pro” moniker, though here at Coolsmartphone we would question whether using the “8” was a wise branding decision.

    So, all these specs are impressive, but what’s the pricing going to be like? Well, the recommended retail price for the Honor 8 Pro is £545.98 on vmall.eu. That’s a bit steep, but pre-orders get a 13% discount and bundled goodies: you can order the Honor 8 Pro in the UK for £474 and receive a free 128GB MicroSD and tripod for example. Shipping and general availability will start on April 20th.

    Source

    The post Honor 8 Pro Announced is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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  • The Huawei P10 – First impressions and camera special

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    This comes on loan from EE, where it’s available for £40.99 per month with 5GB of monthly data and unlimited texts and calls. Although I’ve perhaps not totally unleashed everything it can do – I’m properly impressed so far.

    Out of the box, it was the build quality that got me. In Barcelona I had a good few hours with it but, unlike many of the assembled press there, I didn’t get to keep one. This, then, is my first proper time with the phone at home with my feet up.

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    iPhone fans will tell you about how this has a lot of similarities with devices like the 6s and the 7. I’ll admit, as someone who carries and iPhone and an Android device all day long, it definitely reminded me of the build quality. The cool metal back, the high gloss frontage and a fingerprint sensor / button down below – albeit one that doesn’t depress.

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Inside, it was the EE bits that actually caught my eye first. No, not any additional apps – there aren’t any on this pre-sale version, it was the fact that VoLTE calls popped up on the mobile network settings. Bear in mind that this is an unlocked Huawei P10 and it’s got an EE Pay As You Go SIM in. There’s nothing special about the setup of the phone, but the EE network gave me easy access to both WiFi Calling and 4G Calling.

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    One thing I am struggling to get used to is the new button / fingerprint reader at the bottom. Despite the sizeable space that exists either side of this, there’s no capacitive buttons here. Instead, everything is on-screen as you’ll see from the bottom of the screenshot above. In a way it made me feel like that front-mounted button was a little wasted and should have returned to the back of the phone like on the previous Huawei P9. When I’m using the interface my thumb, especially after switching from an iPhone, naturally heads to that lower button to try and get to the “Home” screen, but here it doesn’t do anything.

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special
    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special
    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Until… you actually switch modes. This “Not For Sale” version didn’t have the Navigation Key set for “virtual navigation” as default, so instead it was all on-screen and felt a bit wasteful and unnatural. If this is the way yours is setup, I’d definitely recommend switching to the “virtual navigation” system, as it turns that fingerprint reader into a navigation control, letting you head “Home”, move back and switch into your running apps quickly. Think of an old-school trackball (like the old HTC Hero), but without the … ball.

    This made everything feel far more natural, and I quickly felt more at home with the P10.

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    I now understand why the fingerprint reader has been put at the front. When this system is activated and it’s on the desk you can just tap it with your finger or thumb to unlock. No need to lift the phone (like you need to on rear-mounted readers). Whilst there’s no “always on” screen, it was easy just to wake the device.

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    You can also choose if you want an app drawer or not..

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    The camera was something I wanted to test pretty much immediately, so I’ve taken a number of shots with both the normal and the wide-angle lens. The wide angle isn’t quite as wide as on my LG G5, and (like many other phones) I had to crank the resolution down to 9 megapixels (from 20 megapixels) to get a 16:9 widescreen shot. When you think about it this is still a little bizarre as, even if you take photos to be printed, the resulting image is wide, not square.

    The wide aperture photos give a shallow depth of field, so if you’re taking shots close up or in a restrictive space it’s definitely worth switching. When you do, the resolution switches to 12 megapixel 4:3 on this loan handset and it’s something I couldn’t change. If I switched back to the normal lens I’d suddenly get the ability to switch to any resolution. The same happened in “Portrait” mode because, if you switch this on, you’ll get the dual-camera setup working together with clever Leica software to produce an artistic and shallow depth of field. This sort of shot is normally restricted to high-end camera gear and when you get it right it looks fantastic. I accidentally left it on when I took this photo and it made the beer look amazing 🙂

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    The Huawei P10 has two camera sensors at the rear. There’s a traditional 12 megapixel chip and a 20 megapixel unit that snaps monochrome images. Both of these are f/2.2 and work together – in portrait mode the P10 will generate a 3D image of your face and will then focus precisely on each part of it. Very clever stuff indeed.

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Now, whilst I’ll stop short of saying that this P10 will replace an expensive high-end camera and I’m definitely not going to tell a photo journalist or nature photographer to ditch their tripod and camera gear, this is a very capable setup.

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    For me it just “worked”. I didn’t really have to fiddle around with the settings a great deal to get a fantastic shot, but it was good to know that the quick options – like Portrait mode or the Wide Aperture shot – were available directly from the preview screen, and I could go further into the photo-snapping world by tweaking all those professional settings by sliding up from the shutter.

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Normal aperture shot

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Wide aperture shot

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Normal aperture

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Wide aperture

    Here’s a few more photo examples. Remember, I’ve not really tried to be “clever” here, this is just how shots came out..

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Normal aperture

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Portrait mode

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Portrait mode

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    HDR Mode on

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Portrait mode

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Auto mode

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Normal

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Portrait

    The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

    Monochrome

    There’s a stack of options available if you need them. So far I’m really happy with the build quality, the speed and the mass of “under the hood” extras that you continually find as you get to use the Huawei P10 more.

    Stay with us and I’ll have a full review in a few days 🙂 Any questions? Head to our Twitter account or add a comment below.

    The post The Huawei P10 – First impressions and camera special is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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  • Review: Huawei P10

    Huawei’s mid-sized flagship handset is the P10, a slim Android smartphone that boasts a unibody metal chassis. The P10’s hardware impresses, and the phone’s core performance ranks with the best. Huawei encountered some software demons when creating the P10’s user interface, however, that prevent the P10 from realizing its full potential. Here is Phone Scoop’s in-depth review.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Apple Retunes Apple Music for Android Devices

    Apple today released Apple Music 2.0 for Android handsets and the app introduces a number of features found on the iOS version. To start, Apple Music for Android drops all elements of Google’s Material Design in favor of Apple’s app design language. The Android app user interface now mirrors that of the iOS version. In-app navigation is simplified thanks to four major sections, called Library, For You, Browse, and Radio. These make it easier for people to move through the app to find their own music or new tunes recommended by Apple. Apple Music 2.0 for Android also adds on-screen song lyrics and larger album art. The app is free to download from the Google Play Store, but the service costs $10 per month.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Coolsmartphone Podcast 201 Live

    Live: on Coolsmartphone.com and YouTube. The Coolsmartphone Podcast is back with a special episode to speak about Apple and Samsung.

    Matteo and Greg will focus exclusively on Samsung and Apple this evening, and may also discuss a certain colour.

    Would you like to interact with the show live? Twitter is the best way: @CSP_Podcast, @todoleo and @gr36 are the handles to use.

    The post Coolsmartphone Podcast 201 Live is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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  • Kensington Introduces ClickSafe 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock

    Kensington®, today introduced its new ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock. The new lock offers all the strength and one-click convenience and keyless engagement of the original ClickSafe lock, in a smaller, uncompromised design to protect sleeker laptops, POS systems and a wide variety of other devices.

    As the industry leader in physical device security for 25 years, Kensington provides the most comprehensive line of laptop security solutions designed for the rigorous demands of Fortune 500 companies, government, financial, healthcare, and education customers. With 20 million locks sold stretching more than 132 million feet — enough to circle around the equator — global brands like Acer®, ASUS®, HP Inc.®, and Lenovo® trust Kensington to provide the anti-theft protection users need to secure their devices and the valuable data kept on them.


    The ClickSafe 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock offers the broadest level of compatibility of any security lock, as its CSAs or Anchors can be attached to virtually any device. The lock features the smaller 5mm keying system used in other Kensington products for common keying systems and worry free administration across Kensington?EU?s range of locks. With anti-pick Hidden Pin™ Technology, the ClickSafe lock head snaps onto the ClickSafe Security Anchor after it has been installed into the Kensington Security Slot found in most laptops. A carbon steel cable deters cutting attempts and the pivot & rotate hinge prevents awkward angles when inserting the key.

    Kensington ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock
    Kensington ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock (SKU# K64435)
    Kensington ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock — Master (SKU# K64436M)
    Kensington ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock — Supervisor (SKU# K64436S)
    Kensington ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock — Like (SKU# K64436L)

    Key features of the Kensington ClickSafe 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock include:

    ?EU? Smaller, Uncompromised Lock Head — Designed to fit sleeker laptops, POS systems and a wide variety of…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Cyborgs at Work: Employees Getting Implanted with Microchips

    The syringe slides in between the thumb and index finger. Then, with a click, a microchip is injected in the employee’s hand. Another “cyborg” is created.

    What could pass for a dystopian vision of the workplace is almost routine at the Swedish startup hub Epicenter. The company offers to implant its workers and startup members with microchips the size of grains of rice that function as swipe cards: to open doors, operate printers, or buy smoothies with a wave of the hand.

    The injections have become so popular that workers at Epicenter hold parties for those willing to get implanted.

    “The biggest benefit I think is convenience,” said Patrick Mesterton, co-founder and CEO of Epicenter. As a demonstration, he unlocks a door by merely waving near it. “It basically replaces a lot of things you have, other communication devices, whether it be credit cards or keys.”

    The technology in itself is not new. Such chips are used as virtual collar plates for pets. Companies use them to track deliveries. It’s just never been used to tag employees on a broad scale before. Epicenter and a handful of other companies are the first to make chip implants broadly available.

    And as with most new technologies, it raises security and privacy issues. While biologically safe, the data generated by the chips can show how often an employee comes to work or what they buy. Unlike company swipe cards or smartphones, which can generate the same data, a person cannot easily separate themselves from the chip.

    “Of course, putting things into your body is quite a big step to do and it was even for me at first,” said Mesterton, remembering how he initially had had doubts.

    “But then on the other hand, I mean, people have been implanting things into their body, like pacemakers and stuff to control your…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today