The Huawei P10 – First impressions and camera special

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

This comes on loan from EE, where it’s available for £40.99 per month with 5GB of monthly data and unlimited texts and calls. Although I’ve perhaps not totally unleashed everything it can do – I’m properly impressed so far.

Out of the box, it was the build quality that got me. In Barcelona I had a good few hours with it but, unlike many of the assembled press there, I didn’t get to keep one. This, then, is my first proper time with the phone at home with my feet up.

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

iPhone fans will tell you about how this has a lot of similarities with devices like the 6s and the 7. I’ll admit, as someone who carries and iPhone and an Android device all day long, it definitely reminded me of the build quality. The cool metal back, the high gloss frontage and a fingerprint sensor / button down below – albeit one that doesn’t depress.

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Inside, it was the EE bits that actually caught my eye first. No, not any additional apps – there aren’t any on this pre-sale version, it was the fact that VoLTE calls popped up on the mobile network settings. Bear in mind that this is an unlocked Huawei P10 and it’s got an EE Pay As You Go SIM in. There’s nothing special about the setup of the phone, but the EE network gave me easy access to both WiFi Calling and 4G Calling.

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

One thing I am struggling to get used to is the new button / fingerprint reader at the bottom. Despite the sizeable space that exists either side of this, there’s no capacitive buttons here. Instead, everything is on-screen as you’ll see from the bottom of the screenshot above. In a way it made me feel like that front-mounted button was a little wasted and should have returned to the back of the phone like on the previous Huawei P9. When I’m using the interface my thumb, especially after switching from an iPhone, naturally heads to that lower button to try and get to the “Home” screen, but here it doesn’t do anything.

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special
The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special
The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Until… you actually switch modes. This “Not For Sale” version didn’t have the Navigation Key set for “virtual navigation” as default, so instead it was all on-screen and felt a bit wasteful and unnatural. If this is the way yours is setup, I’d definitely recommend switching to the “virtual navigation” system, as it turns that fingerprint reader into a navigation control, letting you head “Home”, move back and switch into your running apps quickly. Think of an old-school trackball (like the old HTC Hero), but without the … ball.

This made everything feel far more natural, and I quickly felt more at home with the P10.

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

I now understand why the fingerprint reader has been put at the front. When this system is activated and it’s on the desk you can just tap it with your finger or thumb to unlock. No need to lift the phone (like you need to on rear-mounted readers). Whilst there’s no “always on” screen, it was easy just to wake the device.

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

You can also choose if you want an app drawer or not..

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

The camera was something I wanted to test pretty much immediately, so I’ve taken a number of shots with both the normal and the wide-angle lens. The wide angle isn’t quite as wide as on my LG G5, and (like many other phones) I had to crank the resolution down to 9 megapixels (from 20 megapixels) to get a 16:9 widescreen shot. When you think about it this is still a little bizarre as, even if you take photos to be printed, the resulting image is wide, not square.

The wide aperture photos give a shallow depth of field, so if you’re taking shots close up or in a restrictive space it’s definitely worth switching. When you do, the resolution switches to 12 megapixel 4:3 on this loan handset and it’s something I couldn’t change. If I switched back to the normal lens I’d suddenly get the ability to switch to any resolution. The same happened in “Portrait” mode because, if you switch this on, you’ll get the dual-camera setup working together with clever Leica software to produce an artistic and shallow depth of field. This sort of shot is normally restricted to high-end camera gear and when you get it right it looks fantastic. I accidentally left it on when I took this photo and it made the beer look amazing 🙂

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

The Huawei P10 has two camera sensors at the rear. There’s a traditional 12 megapixel chip and a 20 megapixel unit that snaps monochrome images. Both of these are f/2.2 and work together – in portrait mode the P10 will generate a 3D image of your face and will then focus precisely on each part of it. Very clever stuff indeed.

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Now, whilst I’ll stop short of saying that this P10 will replace an expensive high-end camera and I’m definitely not going to tell a photo journalist or nature photographer to ditch their tripod and camera gear, this is a very capable setup.

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

For me it just “worked”. I didn’t really have to fiddle around with the settings a great deal to get a fantastic shot, but it was good to know that the quick options – like Portrait mode or the Wide Aperture shot – were available directly from the preview screen, and I could go further into the photo-snapping world by tweaking all those professional settings by sliding up from the shutter.

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Normal aperture shot

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Wide aperture shot

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Normal aperture

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Wide aperture

Here’s a few more photo examples. Remember, I’ve not really tried to be “clever” here, this is just how shots came out..

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Normal aperture

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Portrait mode

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Portrait mode

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

HDR Mode on

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Portrait mode

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Auto mode

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Normal

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Portrait

The Huawei P10   First impressions and camera special

Monochrome

There’s a stack of options available if you need them. So far I’m really happy with the build quality, the speed and the mass of “under the hood” extras that you continually find as you get to use the Huawei P10 more.

Stay with us and I’ll have a full review in a few days 🙂 Any questions? Head to our Twitter account or add a comment below.

The post The Huawei P10 – First impressions and camera special is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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  • Review: Huawei P10

    Huawei’s mid-sized flagship handset is the P10, a slim Android smartphone that boasts a unibody metal chassis. The P10’s hardware impresses, and the phone’s core performance ranks with the best. Huawei encountered some software demons when creating the P10’s user interface, however, that prevent the P10 from realizing its full potential. Here is Phone Scoop’s in-depth review.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Apple Retunes Apple Music for Android Devices

    Apple today released Apple Music 2.0 for Android handsets and the app introduces a number of features found on the iOS version. To start, Apple Music for Android drops all elements of Google’s Material Design in favor of Apple’s app design language. The Android app user interface now mirrors that of the iOS version. In-app navigation is simplified thanks to four major sections, called Library, For You, Browse, and Radio. These make it easier for people to move through the app to find their own music or new tunes recommended by Apple. Apple Music 2.0 for Android also adds on-screen song lyrics and larger album art. The app is free to download from the Google Play Store, but the service costs $10 per month.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Coolsmartphone Podcast 201 Live

    Live: on Coolsmartphone.com and YouTube. The Coolsmartphone Podcast is back with a special episode to speak about Apple and Samsung.

    Matteo and Greg will focus exclusively on Samsung and Apple this evening, and may also discuss a certain colour.

    Would you like to interact with the show live? Twitter is the best way: @CSP_Podcast, @todoleo and @gr36 are the handles to use.

    The post Coolsmartphone Podcast 201 Live is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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  • Kensington Introduces ClickSafe 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock

    Kensington®, today introduced its new ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock. The new lock offers all the strength and one-click convenience and keyless engagement of the original ClickSafe lock, in a smaller, uncompromised design to protect sleeker laptops, POS systems and a wide variety of other devices.

    As the industry leader in physical device security for 25 years, Kensington provides the most comprehensive line of laptop security solutions designed for the rigorous demands of Fortune 500 companies, government, financial, healthcare, and education customers. With 20 million locks sold stretching more than 132 million feet — enough to circle around the equator — global brands like Acer®, ASUS®, HP Inc.®, and Lenovo® trust Kensington to provide the anti-theft protection users need to secure their devices and the valuable data kept on them.


    The ClickSafe 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock offers the broadest level of compatibility of any security lock, as its CSAs or Anchors can be attached to virtually any device. The lock features the smaller 5mm keying system used in other Kensington products for common keying systems and worry free administration across Kensington?EU?s range of locks. With anti-pick Hidden Pin™ Technology, the ClickSafe lock head snaps onto the ClickSafe Security Anchor after it has been installed into the Kensington Security Slot found in most laptops. A carbon steel cable deters cutting attempts and the pivot & rotate hinge prevents awkward angles when inserting the key.

    Kensington ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock
    Kensington ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock (SKU# K64435)
    Kensington ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock — Master (SKU# K64436M)
    Kensington ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock — Supervisor (SKU# K64436S)
    Kensington ClickSafe® 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock — Like (SKU# K64436L)

    Key features of the Kensington ClickSafe 2.0 Keyed Laptop Lock include:

    ?EU? Smaller, Uncompromised Lock Head — Designed to fit sleeker laptops, POS systems and a wide variety of…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Cyborgs at Work: Employees Getting Implanted with Microchips

    The syringe slides in between the thumb and index finger. Then, with a click, a microchip is injected in the employee’s hand. Another “cyborg” is created.

    What could pass for a dystopian vision of the workplace is almost routine at the Swedish startup hub Epicenter. The company offers to implant its workers and startup members with microchips the size of grains of rice that function as swipe cards: to open doors, operate printers, or buy smoothies with a wave of the hand.

    The injections have become so popular that workers at Epicenter hold parties for those willing to get implanted.

    “The biggest benefit I think is convenience,” said Patrick Mesterton, co-founder and CEO of Epicenter. As a demonstration, he unlocks a door by merely waving near it. “It basically replaces a lot of things you have, other communication devices, whether it be credit cards or keys.”

    The technology in itself is not new. Such chips are used as virtual collar plates for pets. Companies use them to track deliveries. It’s just never been used to tag employees on a broad scale before. Epicenter and a handful of other companies are the first to make chip implants broadly available.

    And as with most new technologies, it raises security and privacy issues. While biologically safe, the data generated by the chips can show how often an employee comes to work or what they buy. Unlike company swipe cards or smartphones, which can generate the same data, a person cannot easily separate themselves from the chip.

    “Of course, putting things into your body is quite a big step to do and it was even for me at first,” said Mesterton, remembering how he initially had had doubts.

    “But then on the other hand, I mean, people have been implanting things into their body, like pacemakers and stuff to control your…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Productivity and mobility. The QWERTY-powered Gemini

    I’ll be honest, I’ve been experiencing a bit of a lethargic phase recently. There’s been a degree of apathy in the last few weeks as the never-ending wave of phones from Mobile World Congress has almost deadened my mood.

    Why? Well, as much as I understand the reasons, as much as it makes sense, as much as it succeeds; I want to see a new mobile phone form factor. 

    Yes, there was a glimmer of that in Barcelona. I could point to the new BlackBerry KEYone and the dual-screen Hisense A2 but I miss some of the classic form factors. The flip phone. The slide-out keyboard. Come on. It can’t just be me, can it?

    Productivity and mobility. The QWERTY powered Gemini

    So when this dropped into my mailbox I simply had to look. It’s an Indiegogo campaign from Planet Computers, and they want to deliver a device which would definitely float my boat. 

    Think of it as a mini laptop, running Android / Linux. It’s got a full physical QWERTY keyboard and still manages to fit in your pocket. It connects to the web via 4G/Wi-Fi and means that you get that laptop feel without the bulk. Think of it. No more looking down at your screen to make sure that your taps or swipes are being translated into readable text. You can touch-type and you can maintain eye contact with people, just like in the old days.

    Productivity and mobility. The QWERTY powered Gemini

    Imagine using this instead of your normal phone this week. A powerful 10-core CPU and a dedicated graphics processor means that you could buy it for work and productivity whilst actually playing the latest Android games and taking advantage of the Grand National betting offers for this weekend 🙂 Hehehe…

    Dr Janko Mrsic-Flogel, CEO of Planet Computers, tells us..

    The mini keyboards on PDAs in the 1990 were incredibly easy to use and had a loyal fan base of millions.  We are now combining this form factor with the fast processors and 4G/Wi-Fi networks of today to deliver a new level of productivity.

    Specs are said to include a whacking 64GB of storage, a 5.7″ hi-res ultra-wide screen and dual side-mounted speakers. It also has an SD card slot and twice the battery capacity of a normal smartphone. It’ll weigh less than half a kilo and has two USB-C connectors. To find out more, head to their Indiegogo page

    The post Productivity and mobility. The QWERTY-powered Gemini is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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  • T-Mobile Adds Free Roadside Assistance to SyncUp Drive

    T-Mobile today improved the appeal of its SyncUp Drive product by adding access to Allstate Motor Club. T-Mobile is updating the mobile app that accompanies its in-car diagnostics and mobile hotspot tool to include free roadside assistance. Customers who have the SyncUp Drive will need to accept the new terms of service and enroll themselves in the Allstate Motor Club through the mobile app. Once signed up, stranded drivers will be able to summon help with tire changes, tows, fuel delivery, lockouts, or jumps. In addition to roadside assistance, SyncUp Drive also offers vehicle diagnostics, speed alerts, location tracking, driver analysis, and an in-vehicle hotspot. The module costs $150, though T-Mobile is offering it for $2 per month when financed over 24 months ($48 in total). The new SyncUp Drive app is rolling out to Android and iOS devices this week.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    National Archives to White House: Save All Trump Tweets

    The National Archives and Records Administration has told the White House to keep each of President Donald Trump’s tweets, even those he deletes or corrects, and the White House has agreed.

    The head of the archives, David S. Ferriero, told two Democratic senators in a letter last week that the White House has assured him it’s saving all Trump’s Twitter blasts.

    The archives contacted the White House about the matter because the Presidential Records Act requires such correspondence to be preserved for history. Ferriero did not say when the agency contacted White House officials to remind them about the records requirement, but officials briefed the White House counsel’s office about the law on Feb. 2, according to the archivist’s letter to Sens. Claire McCaskill of Missouri and Tom Carper of Delaware.

    The archivist’s letter, dated March 30, doesn’t describe precisely how the White House is saving Trump’s tweets. The Obama administration used an automated system to keep copies of President Barack Obama’s tweets.

    McCaskill and Carper raised the issue of Trump’s tweets in early March following a spate of instances in which Trump had deleted or altered earlier tweets. The two senators had previously raised concerns about Trump’s tweets in a letter to White House counsel Don McGahn.

    The two senators also pressed the archives for information about reports that some White House staffers had been ordered to avoid emails or use smartphone apps that do not preserve emails because of Trump administration concerns about leaks to the media. Ferriero told them he was aware of those press reports but said that White House guidance “to all employees expressly forbids the use of such apps.” Ferriero also said he was not aware of government officials who have been instructed to avoid using email as a method of work-related communication.

    Trump’s almost-daily use of his official White…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Internet use now higher on Android than Windows

    Internet use now higher on Android than Windows

    We are used to hearing news that more people are accessing the web on a mobile device rather than a desktop. However, a new and somewhat significant milestone has been passed, this being that Android’s internet use has overtaken Windows PC’s.

    According to StatCounter the Android platform represented 37.93% of tracked internet activity in March, just barely edging out the Windows 37.91 % share. It’s not quite a landslide victory yet, but it does show just how much we are using our slabs of glass.

    Internet use now higher on Android than Windows

    According to StatsCounter this increase has been helped by the surge in the Asian market, as the smartphone begins to dominate in emerging markets such as China and India. This has had a noticeable knock-on effect with worldwide data statistics. In many emerging markets people just can’t afford the luxury of owning both a personal computer and a smartphone, so with the cheap relative cost of Android smartphones, I can only see this usage increasing.

    Source StatsCounter

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