HTC's U11 Just Wants To Be Squeezed

HTC today announced the U11, a flagship smartphone that responds to squeezes along the side edge. According to HTC, the U11 will open the camera, dictate and send a text message, or even open email with a gentle squeeze. HTC calls this feature Edge Sense and says it will work under most circumstances, such as when the owner is wearing gloves. Other notable features include: support for Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, and HTC Sense Companion voice assistants; HTC BoomSound Hi-Fi Edition speakers and custom-tuned USonic earbuds that now include active noise cancellation; and four microphones for 3D recording. The phone merges the visual appeal of the U Ultra with the specs of a modern flagship. The U11 is made from dual liquid glass surfaces and a metal frame that are resistant to water and liquid damage. The Super LCD 3 display measures 5.5 inches across the diagonal and boasts quad HD resolution. It is protected by Gorilla Glass 5. HTC gave the U11 a Snapdragon 835 processor from Qualcomm with 4 GB of RAM and 64 GB of storage. Other specs include a 12-megapixel main camera with autofocus, BSI sensor, optical image stabilization f/1.7 aperture, and dual LED flash. Shooting modes include HDR Boost, manual, panorama, face detection, hyper-lapse, slow motion, and 4K video. The front-facing camera has a 16-megapixel sensor. HTC selected a 3,000mAh battery that supports Quick Charge 3.0 via the USB-C port. Like the U Ultra, the U11 nixes the 3.5mm headset jack but includes an adapter. The U11 supports most LTE bands for use the U.S. and will be sold by Sprint with HPUE for faster performance on the company’s 2.5 GHz spectrum. HTC plans to sell an unlocked variant of the phone directly to consumers via HTC.com and Amazon.com. Preorders can be made starting today and HTC expects the phone to ship in June. It will be available in black, silver, and blue. The HTC U11 costs $700.

Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

LG G6 – Review

LG G6   Review

I’ve gone through some phases with my smartphones. I switched over to Android with the HTC Hero. It was then a succession of HTC handsets before I switched to a Samsung Galaxy device, but since then I’ve been firmly glued to an LG device. The LG G3 was a great one-handed device and I’ve still got my very battered and bruised G3 in a cupboard. Then came the LG G4, and I mourned the loss of the wireless charging. Then, with the LG G5 I enjoyed the thing so much that I forgot to review it.

Yes, I liked the G5. There were a few criticisms that I had to agree with though. That whole modular thing didn’t really gel with me. Did I slide the battery out? Yes, because I could. No other reason though. I didn’t buy or fit any of those toys that plugged into it, and I’m pretty sure not many others did either. Which is why, I think, the G6 has done away with the modular stuff.

LG G6   Review

Wait a minute though people, because I need to let you into a secret. See, we’ve reached a bit of a problem in the evolution of smartphones. The smartphone manufacturers will never admit it, but we have. If they’re honest, they’ll admit that there’s not many more big “leaps” that we can take with smartphones. Go into your local phone shop and most of the phones will have amazing screens, powerful processors and stunning cameras. Many smartphone manufacturers have tried to come up with new ways to differentiate – wearables and those plug-in modular gadgets have been tried. Now LG are pushing hard with a new screen ratio. It’s 18:9 but, on this one it was the corners of the screen that I noticed first because of the chassis colour more than anything. They’re rounded, and it was something that LG made a bit of a deal about when they launched the thing back in February. They’re not just to look nice either. LG tell us that they’re to reduce the risk of screen damage if you drop the thing. So nerr..

LG G6   Review

They also wanted it to be one handed but, if you want to multi-task, you’re going to have to use two in landscape mode. Especially in this 18:9 format, which means you’ll get two perfectly square panels when you use the multi-window option.

The panel is a 5.7″ one, although in this setup it doesn’t feel overly massive because it’s stretched upwards. Although it looks bigger, the screen hits just less than an 80% screen-to-body ratio.

There’s no capacitive buttons and the earpiece gets squeezed in alongside sensors and a 5 megapixel selfie cam.

LG G6   Review

The Korean-made handset has all the panache and style of Chinese-made rivals, with smooth edges which are largely button-free. Sure, on the left side you have those volume buttons but that’s about it. Up top is a 3.5mm audio port and the SIM / microSD card tray is on the right, but that’s about it. It’s a smooth brushed silver edging which is slightly curved but still maintains the “holdability” of the phone (if there’s such a word).

LG G6   Review

Down at the bottom there’s a USB-C charging port. It’s the one we’re all becoming familiar with and, if I’m honest, I do rather like the fact that I don’t need to worry too much about getting my power plug in the right way around.

LG G6   Review

Next to that you’ll find a speaker with three pretty sizeable holes. Looking at how they fall away into the chassis it’s pretty amazing that this, along with other leading smartphones, can still maintain the water and dust resistance. It can be plopped into 1.5m of water for up to 30 minutes. I wouldn’t say that it would survive a dunk in a pool, but it should survive a lot of accidental drops in water.

LG G6   Review

This European version sadly doesn’t get the wireless charging that I loved on the G3. On that back panel you’ll notice that the fingerprint sensor is still there though. You can press it to activate the screen or you can double-tap the rather beautifully bright display to wake the device. Let’s not forget that the screen is always-on too, so you get to see what’s happening in your world without having to continually fire up the full colour 1440×2880 pixel screen, which has a ~564 ppi pixel density.

If you have the LG G5 then you may notice something slightly weird happens when you zoom in and it switches from the normal lens to the wide-angle one. There was a “jump” as the resolution changed. Here’s that’s been fixed, and the matched rear camera resolutions means that you can zoom into your subject without any judder or resolution change. It’s rather nice, I must say.

LG G6   Review

For the uninitiated, there’s two cameras because one has a wide angle – like your dash cam – and the other is a more traditional one. The two 13 megapixel cameras work well together. The back panel is a flatter experience that the G5, which had a slightly indented camera setup. Here the flash, the fingerprint sensor and the two cameras are at the same level as the rear plastic cover, which slopes off to the edges ever-so-slightly about 4mm before.

What else can I tell you then ? Well, it’s powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 CPU and there’s an Adreno 530 GPU
. That chip also delivers Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0 and there’s power optimizations to help prolong that 3,300 mAh battery. This one, which you can get on EE, has 32GB of on-board storage which you can enhance with a microSD card.

LG G6   Review

So, thoughts so far? Well, I can’t take the battery out, which is a big change from the G5. Also, I’ve now got a slightly-less-good rear camera (the G5 had a 16 megapixel and a 13 megapixel at the back, whereas the G6 has two 13 megapixel units). This UK version doesn’t get wireless charging, which I can forgive in a way (after all, we’re not exactly snowed under with phones supporting it) and it also doesn’t get the Quad Hi-Fi DAC for improved sound quality which comes on the Korean version. Again, I guess I can forgive this but it does grind my gears a little that versions of the same handset can be so different.

LG G6   Review

That screen is beautiful. Bright and clever with that dual square-screen magic. Some apps, and I couldn’t really find many, will display black bars at the top and bottom because they’re not used to the 18:9 layout. In this instance, you can twiddle with the app scaling in the settings. It’s a minor irritation and I didn’t really bother fiddling too much.

LG G6   Review

I think it was just nice to have it there more than anything else. Some YouTube videos and games, which are specifically designed for the 16:9 ration we have on TV’s and other smartphones, can give you that black bar experience.

LG G6   Review

As I’m a bit of a geek, I headed into the settings and found a lot to like. There’s a comfort view to reduce eye strain in the evening (this can be activated from the notification panel and you can set the intensity of this too. Other settings include the ability to adjust the size of screen icons, whether you want the always-on display activated, the home screen buttons and there’s a range of font options so that you can get it looking just as you want. Add to that the themes and the fact that you can fiddle with even the tiniest of things like the vibration strength and the ability to have individual or grouped ringtones for special contacts. It’s fully featured, that’s for sure.

LG G6   Review

The G6 also includes NFC for your Tap & Pay, a “Smart Doctor” to keep your phone in trim (memory, battery and storage-wise) and the ability to change absolutely everything about the home screen.

LG G6   Review

That dual screen capability is something we’ve seen on many other Android phones, and although it’s not a huge leap it does feel a little less cramped thanks to the extra height gained on this 18:9 screen format. Here I’m browsing the web in the top half and checking my mail in the bottom, but I could equally be browsing an important PDF, watching videos on YouTube or looking through the gallery. You activate it by pressing and holding the “Recent Apps” button and then you can either drag down the window to disable or open another app for the bottom section. It’s easy enough when you get into it.

LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review

Inside the phone it’s a gleaming and polished Android 7.0 OS with a smattering of LG apps (LG Friends Manager, LG Health, LG Mobile Switch for transferring data plus an “App trash” system where you can retrieve apps that you may have accidentally deleted). Everything is neatly sorted into folders but, as you’ll notice from these screenshots, there’s no app drawer. This can be changed though, and if you want that back it’s just a simple settings tweak.

LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review

Other apps include an FM radio (you’ll need your headphones to act as an antenna), the Google-connected contacts, calendar, Gmailm, YouTube, Evernote, Maps, YouTube, Photos, Docs, Sheets, Slides…. and.. that’s about it really. My review unit, at least, was relatively uncluttered and I managed to dodge a lot of the LG sign-up screens on first boot, which I appreciated.

LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review

The guts of this phone include a sealed battery unit and a Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 chipset. Yes, the very same one we saw in the OnePlus 3T that came out last year. It’s not exactly an old CPU, but it’s not the newest either. If you ever get in a room with a Sony Xperia ZX owner, you’re going to have an older CPU.. and lower resolution camera and no Gigabit 4G.

LG G6   Review

The camera? Well, I’ve spent a number of weeks using the Huawei P10 and – I have to tell you – I’ve fell in love with the camera on that thing. Amazeballs. Here the LG G6 camera setup and that new same-resolution lens setup means that you get smooth zooms and a more complete camera package, however – as good and as sharp as the pictures are – if you’ve got yourself an LG G6 you’re going to be taking a little step down in the camera resolution as I mentioned earlier.

There’s a stack of camera options, including a “Cheese shutter” and a “Steady recording” option to reduce motion blur. You can also switch HDR on or add a signature to your photos if you’re trying to be all professional 🙂 A range of filters are available and you can even do that clever focus tracking that lets you maintain focus on a moving object.

LG G6   Review

Whether it was my review (“Not for sale”) handset I’m not sure, but when I tried to take shots super-close-up, it was sometimes better to move away from the object and zoom in a little, switching lenses back from the wide-angle one, in order to get a better focused shot.

LG G6   Review

LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review
LG G6   Review

Either way, a very impressive set of example shots here, I’m sure you’ll agree..

LG G6   Review

Sorry about the finger

LG G6   Review

The finger is back!

LG G6   Review LG G6   Review LG G6   Review

LG G6   Review

This one was taken on full zoom

LG G6   Review

LG G6   Review

This one was taken on full zoom

LG G6   Review LG G6   Review LG G6   Review LG G6   Review LG G6   Review LG G6   Review LG G6   Review LG G6   Review LG G6   Review LG G6   Review

LG G6   Review

Very low light

Overall

You’ll probably see a lot of reviews about the dual-screen capabilities and the change to the aspect ration. These are important because we (and I mean the royal smartphone-following and smartphone-making “we”) have reached a point where smartphones are so good, so very, very good that it takes some balls to break from the norm. Here LG have notched the resolution of one of those rear camera lenses down to make them both match. They’ve ditched the modular design we saw on the G5, and they’ve stretched the screen vertically even though it causes some minor (and I mean very, very, very minor) issues. The result is a phone which is easy to hold and use one handed. The result is also a phone which is ever-so-slightly chunky (compared to the Huawei P10) but it feels like it could survive better in a drop test (not that I’m going to test that). I feel like this one, with those rounded corners and the attention to detail, would last longer than my LG G5 (which started having strange microphone issues .. remember how the microphone was attached to the slide-out portion ?)

Interested in this one? Get one. Get the black one if you can, it makes that curved screen melt into the chassis better. This, in my belief, is the phone I wanted the G5 to be. That bulbous, interestingly-styled G5 camera and the modular non-waterproof design? Looking back at it, with the G6 sitting here in the flesh. This is definitely how the G5 should’ve turned out.

The black one is available on EE for £47.99 per month with a £9.99 up-front cost. You’ll get unlimited calls and texts plus 5GB of monthly 4G data on this 32GB model.

The post LG G6 – Review is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

  • Watch the HTC Launch, live

    Here in the UK things will be kicking off in just 30 minutes. However, there’s again no physical launch event and no hordes of reports. Instead, no matter where to are in the world, you can watch the brand new HTC handset getting unveiled here on the HTC website via a digital launch.

    Watch the HTC Launch, live

    As with many other handset manufacturers, HTC wants to stand out, and what we do actually know about this phone already is that it’ll be squeezable. No, not quite like one of those dog toys, but you will be able to squeeze it as you hold the thing in order to access additional features.

    Over the last few days HTC have released teaser videos showing you bits of the phone, and this one below is their latest…

    We’ll of course bring you all the detail when we have it, but until then do join us on the HTC website to watch the launch live. Things kick off in just half an hour from now.

    The post Watch the HTC Launch, live is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

  • YouTube TV Gains More Channels, But Still Limited to Just a Few Cities

    YouTube TV recently added a handful of new channels to its monthly internet-based TV offering. Subscribers will now be able to access and watch programs on AMC, BBC America, IFC TV, Sundance TV, Telemundo, Univision, and We TV. Despite the new channels, the service is only available in Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, Philadelphia, and the San Francisco Bay Area. Google hasn’t said when it YouTube TV will reach more markets.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    BlackBerry Offering Privacy Shade Tool to All Hub+ Subscribers

    BlackBerry today outlined several changes headed to its suite of Android applications, including the general availability of the Privacy Shade. The Privacy Shade was first made available only to BlackBerry-branded handsets, but will soon be available to any Android handset that relies on the BlackBerry Hub+ service. The Privacy Shade lets users adjust the transparency of the filter to suit their surroundings and activate it from the convenience key. Along with the wider availability, Privacy Shade users will also be able to re-size the window. Other new tools include Quick File for moving messages, Google Hangouts notifications, GroupWise mail server out-of-office messages, enhanced message previews when roaming, and the dark theme for the Hub widget. The updates will hit Hub+ in the Google Play Store in the days ahead.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Apple Releases iOS 10.3.2 with Bug Fixes

    Apple today made iOS 10.3.2 available to the iPhone and iPad. The minor system update primarily resolves bugs, patches security holes, and improves performance. Apple has been testing the update for the past month through its developer and public beta programs. iOS 10.3.2 is free to download and install over the air. Apple also distributed watchOS 3.2.2, macOS Sierra 10.12.5, and tvOS 10.2.1 — all of which focus on security and performance.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Unannounced Huawei Phone with Curved Screen Pops Up On FCC Site

    Documents spotted on the FCC’s web site reveal an unannounced handset from Huawei called the LON L29. The most unique aspect of the L29, based on the FCC’s photos, is the curved screen that forms the phone’s front — similar to the Samsung Galaxy S handsets. Other features spotted in the FCC documentation include support for the main U.S. LTE bands (2, 4, 5, 12), as well as NFC, USB-C, and a 3.5mm headset jack. Similar to other recent Huawei phones, the L29 has a dual-camera configuration with Leica lenses. The draft user manual suggests the phone supports dual SIM cards and includes a front-mounted fingerprint reader, though these features are not confirmed. Huawei has not announced the LON L29.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Motorola Debuts the Entry-Level Moto C and Moto C Plus

    Motorola today unveiled two low-cost Android smartphones, the Moto C and Moto C Plus (pictured). Both phones are intended to serve as entry-level handsets for first time and/or cost-conscious buyers. Some of the Moto C’s specs called out by Motorola include a 2,350mAh battery, LTE 4G, 5-megapixel camera with LED flash, 2-megapixel front camera with selfie flash, and a quad-core processor with 1 GB of RAM and 8 GB of storage. The C Plus has a larger 4,000mAh battery and larger screen than the Moto C. It also improves the main camera sensor to 8-megapixels with LED flash, but keeps the 2-megapixel selfie camera. The Moto C Plus includes 1 GB of RAM, 16 GB of storage, and supports microSD memory cards. The devices will ship in Latin America, Europe, and Asia Pacific later this spring. Motorola didn’t say if they’ll be made available to U.S. buyers. The Moto C is priced at approximately $110 and the Moto C Plus is priced at about $130.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Best Weight Loss Gadgets that Help You Achieve Your Dream Body

    In order to lose weight, many people are turning to technology to give them a helping hand.Simply buying a gadget or accessory will not help you lose weight, but it can give daily motivation and simplify your workouts, assist in weight tracking and quantify success. The dynamic duo of technology and accountability can help you […]
    Source: Mobile Magazine

    Judge Orders Uber Not To Use Technology Taken from Waymo

    A federal judge has ordered Uber to stop using technology that a key executive downloaded before he left Waymo, the autonomous car company that was spun off from Google.

    The order filed Monday in a trade secrets theft lawsuit also forces Uber to return all downloaded materials by noon on May 31.

    Judge William Alsup in San Francisco says in the ruling that Waymo has shown “compelling evidence” that a former star engineer named Anthony Levandowski downloaded confidential files before leaving Waymo. The Judge also says evidence shows that before he left Waymo, Levandowski and Uber planned for Uber to acquire a company formed by Levandowski.

    Waymo sued Uber in February alleging that the ride-hailing company is using stolen self-driving technology to build its own fleet of autonomous cars. The ruling prevents Uber from using the technology on a navigational tool called Lidar that robotic cars use to see what’s around them.

    The decision was only a partial victory for Waymo, however. The company had sought to shut down Uber’s autonomous car program completely until the dispute is settled. But Alsup determined that Waymo’s patent infringement theories were too weak to support such an order. The judge ruled that although it’s hard to imagine that Levandowski “plundered Waymo’s vault the way he did” with no intent to use the material, Waymo still fell short of showing that the trade secrets were used.

    Uber said in a statement Monday that it’s pleased the court allowed it to continue self-driving car research, including its own Lidar innovations. “We look forward to moving toward trial and continuing to demonstrate that our technology has been built independently from the ground up,” the statement said.

    Google, a unit of Alphabet Inc., said it welcomed the order stopping Uber from using “stolen documents containing trade secrets developed by Waymo through years of…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today