Spotify Readies for IPO: Will Investors Sing Along with Music Giant?

Spotify is poised to press the play button on a stock market float that will test investors’ faith in its future prospects, amid mixed fortunes for fast-growing technology companies.

Analysts said the performance of the music streaming service’s shares on its first day of trading on Tuesday would gauge market opinion on whether it can stave off fierce competition for music fans’ wallets and eventually make a profit.

The Swedish company’s listing on the New York Stock Exchange will also offer greater insight into investors’ attitudes to technology companies, following a string of floats that have attracted great fanfare but met with varying receptions.

Wall Street offered a timely reminder of the volatility that can affect firms reliant on the promise of things to come, as electric car firm Tesla’s shares slumped nearly 7% in early trading on Monday.

Billionaire Elon Musk’s company suffered amid forecasts that deliveries of its Model 3 vehicle are falling short of its targets, as investigators look into a fatal crash involving one of its cars in the self-steering Autopilot mode.

Spotify, like fellow tech firms such as Tesla and Uber, is yet to make a profit, as its income struggles to keep pace with costs, including the royalties it pays to record labels and artists.

Analysts expect it to be valued at $20bn-$25bn, although the listing is also something of a plunge into the unknown for potential investors.

Unlike most companies that float, Spotify is not issuing any new stock, which means it has not set a price for its shares in advance.

Would-be investors cannot turn to Spotify’s past earnings for guidance because it has never reported any, racking up losses over the past three years.

The element of uncertainty could cause peaks and troughs in the price of Spotify shares, according to Laith Khalaf of stockbroker Hargreaves Lansdown.

“This approach will save…
Source: Mobile Tech Today

Most US Galaxy Note8 Owners Receiving Android 8 Oreo

Samsung’s U.S. carrier partners are rolling out Android 8 Oreo to the Galaxy Note8 handset. AT&T kicked things off last month and was followed by Sprint and Verizon Wireless. In the last day, T- Mobile, too, has begun pushing Oreo to the Note8. With the carrier variants picking up Android 8, only the unlocked version remains. Samsung said people who own the unlocked Note8 (and S8, S8+) can expect to see Android 8 in the next few weeks. The update includes the core Android 8 code (notification dots, autofill, picture-in-picture) in addition to the latest version of Samsung’s user interface. Samsung released the Galaxy Note8 last September.

Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

EU tech benefits that Britain has ditched

EU tech benefits that Britain has ditched
Last year, after a lot of waiting and a lot of discussion, we finally got proper roaming across the bulk of Europe. It doesn’t cost you any extra, and many Brits are only just realising what a good thing it actually is. Fly to Germany, Spain, Cyprus and use your phone just like you would back in the UK. Great.

Also, just yesterday another EU legislation kicked in, meaning that us Brits now have something called “content portability”. This means that you can watch local versions of subscription streaming services while visiting other EU countries. That means, if you’re in the “Red Hen” pub in Ibiza, you can whip out your UK mobile and football on Sky Go. So you’re using your UK data allowance (great!) and your UK online TV subscription (great!)

EU tech benefits that Britain has ditched

Provided it’s only temporary (and you don’t live out in Spain or somewhere all the time), you’re fine. Netflix is the same, as is NOW TV, Spotify and Apple Music.

However, after March 29th next year, all of these benefits could go in the bin. The UK Government has been quick to add some damage limitation on this, stating that they’re looking to keep the deal as part of “exit negotiations”. However, as is usual with Brexit, we can’t expect to keep the privileges if we’re not part of the EU any longer. Will we get inclusive roaming? Who knows. Will we be able to listen to our Spotify streams and watch TV abroad? Nobody can say “yes” for sure.

In other news, and .eu domains that have UK registrants will be cancelled. That’s around 300,000 domains for companies in the UK, purchased by people seeking to show their EU business credentials. The EU statement says…

As of the withdrawal date, undertakings and organizations that are established in the United Kingdom but not in the EU and natural persons who reside in the United Kingdom will no longer be eligible to register .eu domain names.

As a result of the withdrawal of the United Kingdom, a holder of a domain name does no longer fulfil the general eligibility criteria… the Registry for .eu will be entitled to revoke such domain name on its own initiative and without submitting the dispute to any extrajudicial settlement of conflicts.

So, if you’re a UK haulage company and have a .eu domain, tough. If you trade with the EU and want to show your European credentials with the .eu domain, it’s back to a .co.uk for you.

The post EU tech benefits that Britain has ditched is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.


Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

Battery – 1%. Stressed much?

Battery   1%. Stressed much?Does this sight make you nervous?

I came across some interesting information when I was out in Paris the other day. Apparently one of the things that we smartphone users stress about most is our battery life.  Now, I am no behavioural therapist, but I decided to do a quick ask around in the office. The long and short of it is that most of my colleagues don’t really worry about it that much. This is most likely due to the fact that we work in Coolsmartphone Towers and have more chargers at hand than should be healthy.

However, we seem to be in the minority on this front, as the results of the research below shows something quite different.

Most ranked stressful situations* 

  1. Running out of phone battery at a crucial moment (7.2/10)
  2. Being late for a meeting or an event (6.7/10)
  3. Starting a new job (6.5/10)
  4. Rowing with your partner, getting a dressing down from your boss, missing a train, job interview, getting stuck in traffic (6.4/10)
  5. Car breaking down (6.3/10)
  6. Getting locked out of the house (6.2/10)
  7. Moving to a new house, Writing a presentation / essay (6.1/10)
  8. Rowing with your children (5.8/10)
  9. Public Speaking (5.7/10)
  10. Becoming a parent (5.5/10)

*Most ranked stressful situations on a scale 1-10 (10 being very stressful, 1 being not stressful at all)

So it seems that the UK public is more concerned with their phones running out of juice than getting a new house!
Battery   1%. Stressed much?

Here, Huawei have setup a group called “Phone Anonymous” so that people can get some help…

Here are the views of a trained psychologist in the form of Dr Linda Papadopoulos;

“The research from Huawei has highlighted that smartphones have become an intrinsic part of our lives and people now see them very critical to human interaction. Individuals rely on their phones to do a multitude of things, from telling them the time, acting as their GPSto helping connect them with the rest of the world. When phone failures occur, such as a dead battery or lack of storage availability, individuals feel a sense of isolation or as though they’re not able to perform to their full capability. This causes an instant moment of stress – which the survey has shown. Humans feel a connection to their smartphones in the same way they have a connection to a best friend or family member – but they also feel a dependence on them and how they facilitate their lives which is why being without them is so difficult.”

I suppose that it is a good thing that we’re now starting to see phones with larger-capacity batteries becoming the norm, along with more efficient chipsets. Hopefully, it will allow us to stop worrying about the juice in our phones.

If you do want a long-lasting battery then there are a wide array of phones available, including several from Huawei and Honor that we have put through their paces over the years. Have a look at some of the reviews here and here.

If, on the other hand, you are needing someone to talk to about the battery life woes, you can call this number – 0800 020 9348*. I am not kidding, this is a real thing to allow you vent your battery frustrations.

*Charges will apply check with billpayer

OUT OF BATTERY: SMARTPHONE BATTERIES RUNNING OUT PROVES MORE STRESSFUL
FOR BRITS THAN ROWING WITH A PARTNER OR BEING LATE FOR A MEETING

 

  • Brits admit that poor battery life on their smartphones causes more stress (7 out of 10 with 10 the most stressful) than rowing with a partner (6/10) or being late for a meeting (6/10)
  • Research from smartphone manufacturer Huawei has revealed the nation’s frustrations with their smartphones.
  • In response Huawei has launched the A Phone Anonymous Helpline for exasperated smartphone users to vent their woes.

 

63% of Brits are in a love/hate relationship with their current smartphones and want to switch devices but feel locked into their current brand (18%), according to a new survey by smartphone manufacturer Huawei.

 

The study of over 2,000 British smartphone owners discovered the key annoyances people have with their mobile phones with short battery life (47%), lack of storage (26%), poor reception (25%) and having their phone screen freeze (18%) some of the key technological bugbears.

 

In fact, Brits find leaving their phone at home even more stressful than missing an appointment, forgetting keys, wallet or missing public transport.

 

Huawei are determined to help the nation have a more positive relationship with their smartphone and have launched the free A Phone Anonymous Line on 0800 020 9348 to allow people to vent their frustrations.

 

Most ranked stressful situations* 

  1. Running out of phone battery at a crucial moment (7.2/10)
  2. Being late for a meeting or an event (6.7/10)
  3. Starting a new job (6.5/10)
  4. Rowing with your partner, getting a dressing down from your boss, missing a train, job interview, getting stuck in traffic (6.4/10)
  5. Car breaking down (6.3/10)
  6. Getting locked out of the house (6.2/10)
  7. Moving to a new house, Writing a presentation / essay (6.1/10)
  8. Rowing with your children (5.8/10)
  9. Public Speaking (5.7/10)
  10. Becoming a parent (5.5/10)

*Most ranked stressful situations on a scale 1-10 (10 being very stressful, 1 being not stressful at all)

 

Dr Linda Papadopoulos, psychologist comments: “The research from Huawei has highlighted that smartphones have become an intrinsic part of our lives and people now see them very critical to human interaction. Individuals rely upon their phones to do a multitude of things, from telling them the time, acting as their GPSto helping connect them with the rest of the world. When phone failures occur, such as a dead battery or lack of storage availability, individuals feel a sense of isolation or as though they’re not able to perform to their full capability. This causes an instant moment of stress – which the survey has shown. Humans feel a connection to their smartphones in the same way they have a connection to a best friend or family member – but they also feel a dependence on them and how they facilitate their lives which is why being without them is so difficult.”

 

Research from Huawei earlier this year also showed that smartphone photography is also important to users with 77% people in the UK wanting great photos with fewer attempts, whilst 84% want a smartphone camera that lets them zoom in without losing definition.

 

“It’s important that our smartphones are benefitting us in our day-to-day lives rather than hindering us. Our research tells us that one in five British smartphone owners slam or throw their phone in frustration during a technical fail, and that’s something we want to help to change,” said Justin Costello, Head of Marketing for Huawei UK & Ireland‘’We are leading a new renaissance in smartphone photography with our new P20 Pro, which features a 4000 mAh battery and the world’s first Leica triple camera. It’s only through meaningful innovation like this that we can remove smartphone frustrations from people’s lives.’’ 

 

Smartphone frustrations also seem to be affecting UK comedy talent including Russell Kane, Marlon Davis, Jake Yapp and star of Made in Chelsea and Celebrity Big Brother, Ashley James who can all be seen discussing their problems here https://youtu.be/ihp-Y60ea1s.

 

To find out more about the Huawei P20 range visit www.newrenaissance.com.

 

ENDS

Notes to editors:

Research conducted by Ginger Comms on behalf of Huawei in an online survey of 2,006 UK adults between March 13-19, 2018.

 

About Huawei Consumer BG

Huawei’s products and services are available in more than 170 countries, and are used by a third of the world’s population, ranking second in the world for mobile phone shipments in 2017 Sixteen R&D centers have been set up in the United States, Germany, Sweden, Russia, India and China. Huawei Consumer BG is one of Huawei’s three business units and covers smartphones, PC and tablets, wearables and cloud services, etc. Huawei’s global network is built on almost 30 years of expertise in the telecom industry and is dedicated to delivering the latest technological advances to consumers around the world.

The post Battery – 1%. Stressed much? is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.


Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

New Cars Getting the High-Tech Treatment for Safety

Autonomous vehicles get all the headlines, but automakers are gradually adding advanced electronic safety features to human-driven cars as they step toward a world of self-driving vehicles.

Car and tech companies are rolling out laser sensors, artificial intelligence, larger viewing screens that show more of the road, cameras that can read speed limit signs, and systems that slow cars ahead of curves and construction zones.

Many of the new features repurpose cameras and radar that already are in cars for automatic emergency braking, pedestrian detection and other safety devices. The companies also are keeping a closer watch on drivers to make sure they’re paying attention.

On Monday, Arizona’s governor suspended Uber’s self-driving vehicle testing privileges after one of its autonomous vehicles struck and killed a pedestrian last week. But auto engineers and industry analysts still say roads will become safer as more vehicles get automated features that either assist or replace human drivers. The government says 94 percent of crashes are caused by human error.

The cutting-edge devices usually come out first in more expensive vehicles, but go to mainstream vehicles as costs fall.

Here are five new safety devices that are showing up in vehicles:

Stay Focused: A company called NVIDIA is using artificial intelligence and cameras to sense where a driver is looking and focus sensors everywhere else. If a pedestrian or another vehicle appears where the driver isn’t looking, the system will intervene, either sounding a warning or by stopping the car from moving, says Danny Shapiro, senior director of automotive business for the Santa Clara, California, company. “Before we get to full automation, if the driver is still in control and responsible, we want to know when we should provide alerts and when we should not,” Shapiro says. NVIDIA has a contract with Volkswagen to deploy the system in the next two…
Source: Mobile Tech Today

Sony Xperia XZ1 – Review

The Introduction

Sony have had a mixed reaction to their phones. The design has changed very little since the launch of the Xperia Z, and even with a high megapixel numbers in their camera, some people have had varied results.

In comes the Xperia XZ1, which takes the best points of the original XZ but slims the design a little. This makes it easier to use and hold. They’ve also added the latest range of networking under the hood for faster speeds and more power.

But is it enough to stand out against the rest of the competition and get you to open your wallet?

Check on for all the details on the new Sony Xperia XZ1, with thanks to Vodafone for the loan device.

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

Design and display

Sony have been making their Z range of devices for years, mainly keeping the same design language each time, but improving on the internals to keep up with the rest of the competition each year.

With the design it almost felt like ‘if it’s not broken, don’t change it’ decision, thankfully we have seen a change in the new Xperia XZ2, which is their latest, but more expensive flagship coming out in April.

With a premium design featuring a Gorilla Glass 5 display and a aluminium unibody frame, the XZ1 is well built, yet thin at 7.4mm and light at 155g in weight.

Sony still insist on having HUGE bezels on the top and bottom of the front, this is a shame as it makes the screen feel smaller than it actually is.

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

Looking straight at the device, the front facing camera is an impressive 13 megapixel lens and can also record at 1080p quality for video at 30 frames per second.

At 13 megapixels, the XZ1 has one of the best front facing cameras on a smartphone at the moment, helped by using the display as a flash to let you take those late night drunken selfie photos you will regret in the morning.

Up top you also have a small notification light which will flash when you have any unread notifications, it also stays green when fully charged.

Also up at the top is the earpiece and the proximity sensor which detects when your ear is next to the screen and turns off the display to prevent accidental taps, it also helps detect the light and can adjust the screen brightness to get maximum battery life.

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

The display comes in at 5.2 inches with a resolution of 1080×1920, making it 1080p and a PPI of 424. This makes it a decent display without being amazing.

The screen itself is IPS LCD which works fairly well, even in bright sunlight conditions, and best of all it features the new HDR10 technology which means you get to watch HDR video content from places such as Amazon and Netflix if you want.

If the screen temperature is not to your liking there is also the option to manually change it in settings. Here you can add more warmth or have a cooler white balance.

Right up top you have one of the dual front facing speakers, which is great for watching videos or playing music back.

Below the screen is where you find the other front facing speaker. This helps a lot when playing games as your finger is not in the way.

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

Considering the large chin on the XZ1, you would think there was enough space for some hardware buttons, however all navigation is done via the on-screen controls instead.

Thankfully the layout is pretty simple as it’s in keeping with most other Android devices – a back arrow to take you back a screen, a home button in the middle and a multitasking button on the right.
Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

The device has a metal frame running all the way around which makes it strong and sturdy, plus it gives it a premium feel when you pick it up.

Looking over to the left side first you have a removable tray in the middle. This is where you place your Nano SIM and also microSD card if you have one.

A slight annoyance is the tiny awkward SIM tray, which if lost makes your device unusable on a network. That said, this is true for pretty much every device on the market now.

You may be looking at the above photo and wondering what those two rectangle areas are, one up the top, and one down the bottom?

These are for the antenna system and help the XZ1 get a signal where other may struggle at times.

It does not really interfere with the overall look though.

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

Continuing the metal frame round to the right side you have another set of rectangles for that added signal quality up top.

Below this is an up and down volume switch which as you may expect is used primarily for volume controls, it does also have other uses though such as acting as a zoom button in the camera screen.

Under the volume buttons you have a large silver power button for putting the device into standby mode, however it also has a fingerprint sensor built in for unlocking the phone and for Google Pay to authorise the payment if locked.

Finally at the bottom is something I wish more devices had, especially if their main selling point is the camera – a dedicated camera shutter button.

This small yet vital button lets you hold the phone like a normal digital camera, half press to focus using the laser focus sensor on the back before fully pressing down to capture the photo.

The clever software also captures some photos whilst focussing to predict the photo you want and offer you the best one from a series.

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

Flipping over to the top you get the 3.5mm headset jack, whilst many take this for granted, many devices these days lack this feature.

The only other interesting part on the top is the small hole which is a noise cancelling mic and is also used for capturing audio when recording video.

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

Finally moving down to the bottom you find the USB-C charging port which has now become pretty standard in devices, and much better than the older type as it is reversible….no more breaking chargers by forcing in the wrong way.

Just like up top, there is a small noise cancelling mic at the bottom.

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

Turn over to the back and will find the metal body with 19 megapixel camera, sensors a plenty as well as the Xperia logo.

The sensors on the back include laser auto-focus for crisp blur-free photos in any conditions. Also a white balance sensor to help with overall quality improvements and the NFC chip for Google Pay or other contactless options.

This really is a well built phone but manages to stay thin and protected at the same time.

Cameras

Sony are well known for their camera technology, not only do they make some of the best point and shoot cameras there are, they use some of this key technology in their mobile devices and have some great key selling points.

Sony are big on their branding, the XZ1 camera alone has Motion Eye, Exmor RS, Sony Lens G and Bionz for mobile are the main ones, all rather confusing.

That is a lot to take in, but each has a good background to it. The tech helps keep your photos in focus and will start taking photos as you are pressing the camera button. You can then pick the perfect photo and allow that fancy AR and 960fps slow motion video to perform some magic.

The Xperia XZ1 has lowered the resolution from the previous model. It’s down from 23 megapixels to 19 megapixels, but this is more than enough for most people unless you are printing something on an A1 poster, and who does that without using a professional DSLR?

Most of the decent camera phones on sale have an aperture of around f1.8, with Samsung pushing the bar on their latest S9 offering f1.5 instead.

The Xperia Xz1 comes in at f2.0 which in theory should mean it struggles to compare with some other devices in low lighting conditions. This is especially true as it also lacks OIS, but thankfully it is not that noticeable thanks to some clever software helping improve the overall photo.

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

This phone really impresses when it comes to taking photos in sunlight or with great natural lignting, it also captures some great ‘bokeh’ photos even though it only has a single lens to use.

Low light struggles a little but still produces some acceptable quality shots for sharing on social media. This also means you can still leave your digital camera back at home.

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

When you load the camera you’re met with one of the easiest interfaces when it comes to mobile photography.

Looking at the left side first, up top is the option to switch between the front and back cameras. This obviously lets you switch from a normal photo or a selfie.

Under this you get a slider control which lets you change between video recording, intelligent auto mode and manual mode if you know how to get the best settings for the advanced camera user.

If you are wondering what that !Intelligent Auto” mode is, this is the handy software from Sony which helps to judge what you are taking a photo of, and help get the best settings for you. So all you have to do is point and click.

In practice it works quite well, often changing between modes such as “nighttime” and “macro” when it works out how close you are to your object or what your lighting condition is like.

Lastly on the left is the flash button which lets you change the flash between On, Off and Auto. Personally I leave it on Auto and let the phone work it out for me.

Looking at the right side you get a square preview of your last photo that was taken, and as you would expect, tapping this opens the gallery to browse through all your photos or videos.

Below you find the camera shutter button for taking photos. This switches to video if you are in video recording mode with an extra button above for recording a clip in slow motion if you want, however the XZ1 is one of the few phones that has a dedicated camera button up top, and I found this the best way to take photos.

At the bottom you have the ‘gear’ icon to change the settings such as resolution, quality and where you want to save the photos (internal or memory card)

Next to this is what mode you are in, in the screenshot above shows “Backlight” which helped boost the lighting as it was a little cloudy outside. This will change to “Macro” when up close or “Night” if you are taking photos in the evening. There are more options of course, these are just a few examples.

Below are some examples, taking in all different locations and conditions. You can see a real world test of what you can expect to get out of this device.

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Photos are good quality and detail to use as a standalone camera, and the auto software is great at detecting the scene and getting the most out of the 19 megapixel camera.

Sony are really impressive when it comes to their video recording on their top end devices. Here, not only can you record in 4K, but Sony were the first to offer 960fps slow motion video recording. We’re only just starting to see this on more recent competitor devices.

Below are a few examples of normal video clips, plus some slow motion clips. This shows just how cool it is to slow your recording right down.

A word of warning though, make sure you have good lighting if you want the super slow motion mode, this is because indoor lights make the clip look like the lights are flashing and makes the output quite poor.

Sony also have another great feature in the camera which uses AR technology to overlay items onto the real world to add a bit of fun

Sony Xperia XZ1   Review
Sony Xperia XZ1   Review
Sony Xperia XZ1   Review
Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

As you can see in the few examples above, you can add a range of extras to your photo from little people to dinosaurs, and whilst it can’t compete with the amazing Pixel AR effects, it does allow a bit of fun to share on social media or with friends.

Performance and battery

Performance is a on par with a lot of flagship devices, packing Snapdragon 835 processor with 4GB of RAM. In fact, performance is one area you will not have to worry about. When testing some games out I had no problems, including Pokemon Go which can be trouble on some devices.

I had use of the Sony Xperia XZ1 for about 2 weeks, in that time I was connected to Vodafone 4G most of the time and managed to get a day of use easily, this included social media, 2 email accounts syncing, using the camera as well as lots of speed tests trying out 4G+.

Network performance is an area Sony are never holding back on. The XZ1 features 4×4 MIMO and Gigabit LTE which allows for blazing fast downloads if you’re in a covered area.

My home address has just been upgraded to 4G+ and I was seeing speeds of around 150 Mbps download and 30 Mbps upload. Faster results are expected in areas like London and Birmingham, but considering this was in little old Torquay, I was very impressed.

The battery has lowered from the previous model and is now 2700mAh down from 2900mAh on the XZ, but it was still plenty to get me through a day with a good amount of use over the 4G network. Even if you do start running low you have Stamina mode built in to help, or Quick Charge 3.0 for a quick boost if you are near a charger. Sadly though, no wireless charging to be found.

If you are looking to get the XZ1, the camera would be one of the main points of interest, and thankfully the battery can cope through a normal day including taking photos and videos, so you will have no concerns about running out.

Software

The Sony UI, or “skin” as some will call it, is quite heavy when compared to something you’d find on a Google Pixel. However, this is not always a bad thing, and it does add some more customisation options to enjoy, such as themes, transitions, widgets, wallpapers and the grid size for the icons.

One area of the software wherr Sony excels is with their power saving modes. This, as mentioned before, is called “Stamina Mode” and helps cut back the power-heavy tasks to get every bit of battery life possible saved for calls and texts.

“Lounge” is an app pre-installed which gives you access to a load of content from Sony. They have also installed the Playstation app which is great for anyone who loves their gaming or who has a PS account already.

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Sony Xperia XZ1   Review

The Xperia XZ1 comes with Android 8.0 Oreo out of the box, which means it has most of the latest improvements from the OS. Android 8.1 should be to rolling out soon and this will be the version you stay on until Android 9 comes out. However, it is worth pointing out that Sony are not the quickest when it comes to updates, so you may be waiting a little while.

The great thing with Android though is, if you don’t like what Sony have done with their software, you can always install a third party launcher such as Nova Launcher and get a new feel for the phone whilst getting the impressive hardware still.

Conclusion

Sony make some of the best mobile hardware. They also don’t seem to skimp on the network side of things, packing in advanced technology such as Gigabit LTE and 4×4 MIMO (these help network performance and generate super fast speeds).

Processor-wise, the Snapdragon 835 performs well with 4GB of RAM and a 2700Ah battery. You won’t notice any slow down or stutter when using this as a daily driver.

Overall the camera is decent enough for most people out there. The main downfall is lack of OIS, which impacts the low light quality unless you have a tripod to steady everything. Daytime shots are good and the super slow motion is really good fun.

Whilst on paper the XZ1 has a lower capacity battery and a lower megapixel camera verses the phone is was replacing, the updated networking speeds and thinner design make up for some of the spec changes. Let’s face it, a 19 megapixel camera is hardly something to consider a shortfall.

Costing £520 to buy on PAYG, most people will look towards a Pay Monthly option to get hands on this device, thankfully it starts from £35 a month and comes with minutes, texts and some data.

If you want a smartphone from a big-name brand but want something different from all the Samsung Galaxy devices out there, Sony do make a good alternative, especially with their camera technology bringing some great features at a cheaper price.

A big thank you to Vodafone for providing the Xperia XZ1 for us to review.

The post Sony Xperia XZ1 – Review is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.


Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News