Top Five Budget Handsets of 2017

Not everyone has the means or the desire to spend $1000 on a smartphone. There’s good news: phone makers spent 2017 shoring up their ranks of budget-friendly devices, which now offer an incredible amount of performance for the dollar. These are the top five sub-$200 handsets of the year.

Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

Honor View 10 photo special

Honor View 10 photo specialWe are deep into the mid festive slump but, for some of us, work has to carry on for a few more days before the shenanigans of the New Year begin. In an effort to cheer you all up, I have been busy taking pictures of the soon-to-be-released Honor View 10.

This is the phone that is going to be pitching itself against the likes of the One Plus 5T when it hits the shelves in the next few weeks.

I have been pretty impressed with the camera on this phone as it has been able to catch some very good pictures in a mix of conditions. The day that I was taking most of these pictures was, to be fair, a sunny and crisp winters morning. I have not yet had the chance to test the phone in very low light conditions.

Here are a few shots to enjoy..

Honor View 10 photo special
Honor View 10 photo special
Honor View 10 photo special
Honor View 10 photo special
Honor View 10 photo special
Honor View 10 photo special

Here are a couple that were taken in black and white using the Monochrome mode.

Honor View 10 photo special
Honor View 10 photo special
Honor View 10 photo special
Honor View 10 photo special

As you can see the Monochrome sensor does a really good job catching the contrasting light levels, even when used to take photos into the sun. This would normally blow out the RGB sensor.

Since I started writing this article I also captured a few low light shots of our basement at Coolsmartphone Towers. They are not the most exciting picture in the world but they at least give you an idea of the sort of detail that can be picked up by the camera.

Honor View 10 photo special
Honor View 10 photo special
Honor View 10 photo special

I have to say that overall I am pretty impressed by the camera. It is returning some good high-quality shots and is in my opinion punching well into the Huawei Mate 10 Pro category for images. This is not all that surprising given that the hardware is very similar between the two.

I will need to test the camera further to be totally conclusive but, from these initial first impressions, I am very happy.

I hope that you enjoy the pictures and rest assured that my full review is being prepared at the moment.

Oh and Happy New Year to one and all!

The post Honor View 10 photo special is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

  • Apple Lowers Battery Replacement Cost to $29 Immediately

    Apple made $29 replacement batteries available to owners of older iPhones effective starting today. The drop, announced earlier this week, was originally slated to go into effect in late January. “We expected to need more time to be ready, but we are happy to offer our customers the lower pricing right away,” said Apple in a statement provided to Axios. “Initial supplies of some replacement batteries may be limited.” Apple uses software to limit the performance of some older iPhones in order to prevent battery-related shutdowns. Replacing the original, aging battery with a new one resolves such issues and leads to better performance of the smartphone. The battery replacement service typically costs $79, but Apple has lowered the cost to $29. The program will run through December 2018 and targets the iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6s, 6s Plus, and SE.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Alexa? Cortana? Siri? Choosing the Right Smart Speaker

    Move over, Alexa. While Amazon pioneered the internet-connected speaker that responds to voice commands, it now has plenty of competition from other tech heavyweights. Even the original Amazon Echo has six Alexa-powered alternatives vying for your attention and dollars.

    Digital assistants on these speakers — Amazon’s Alexa, Google Assistant, Microsoft’s Cortana and soon Apple’s Siri — can play music, set timers and read off your calendar events. These speakers can also serve as a gateway to controlling other internet-connected appliances, such as smart lights, thermostats and even streaming video on TVs.

    Here’s a guide to choosing one for you or a loved one.

    The Choices

    Amazon’s $100 Echo is smaller and costs half what the original did at its 2014 debut. Variations range from the $50 Echo Dot, which has a lower-quality speaker, to the $230 Echo Show, which has a touch screen.

    Google’s speaker, the $129 Google Home, no longer challenges the main Echo on price. Bargain hunters can get the Google Home Mini [pictured here] for $49. Or splurge for high-quality speakers in the $399 Google Home Max.

    Early next year, Apple will compete at the high end with the $349 HomePod. Beyond that, Microsoft’s assistant appears on Invoke, a $199 speaker made by Samsung’s Harman Kardon business. Samsung is also planning a speaker based on its own Bixby assistant, but there’s no word yet on when.

    Other manufacturers are also making speakers with Alexa or Google Assistant built-in.

    The Smarts

    You can talk to Alexa, Google Assistant and Cortana as you would a friend. Ask any of them, “Do I need an umbrella today?” to get the forecast for rain. (Siri’s capabilities on HomePod won’t be fully known until it comes out.)

    Nonetheless, no single assistant does everything well. Alexa, for instance, won’t let you set an alarm more than 24 hours out; its rivals do.

    All three…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    BlackBerry Motion – Review

    The Introduction

    BlackBerry have always been a brand with a dedicated base of followers around the world. When that brand made the switch from its own BB OS and moved to Android, it opened up a whole new world of apps and services.

    The Motion is not an upgrade from the other main device, the KeyOne, instead it’s more of an alternative for anyone who does not want a keyboard.

    This is another device made my manufacturer TCL under the BlackBerry branding and is their latest one yet, but is it their greatest?

    Check on for all the details on the new BlackBerry Motion.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review


    Design and display

    These days a lot of smartphones do tend to look the same, some say Apple have had a big part in this, with rivals trying to copy the iconic design of the iPhone. However not all competitors go with this design and thankfully the Motion is different in it’s own unique way. From the textured back to the almost rectangular block feeling and the design it has going for it.

    With a premium looking phone with metal and glass, you would initially think that it will be quite heavy to hold and use on a daily basis, thankfully that is a misconception. At 167g in weight, the BlackBerry Motion is defiantly lighter than the more expensive KeyOne which comes in at 180g.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    Looking straight at the device, the front facing camera is an 8 megapixel unit and can also record at 1080p quality for video at 30 frames per second. This is quite a high resolution camera for a phone from BlackBerry considering.  Next to this is the speaker where voice calls come across both clear and loud enough for daily use.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    The display is a reasonable 5.5 inch panel with a resolution of 1080 by 1920. This makes it Full HD like many other mid range devices at this price point. Some may wish it had a Quad HD display, especially considering the Motion has the battery to power it, but in reality 1080p is more than enough for most people.

    There has been a lot talked online recently about a ‘blue tint’ on certain models when tilting the screen, the Motion does not suffer from this thankfully and the fact it uses IPS LCD over AMOLED should also help prevent that dreaded screen burn over time.

    Below the screen is where you find the main navigation buttons and fingerprint reader under  the now-iconic BlackBerry logo.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    On the left is a back arrow to move back through the OS and screen. On the right side is the multi-tasking button to close apps. Personally I hate the way the way the apps look when opening this setting.

    That middle physical button (which is also the fingerprint reader) will let you unlock and pay for goods using Android Pay. This is very handy and works like Apple Pay.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    The device has a metal frame with a nice feel and texture to it. This helps in keep to the ‘premium’ style and elevates the BlackBerry branding. It perhaps makes you happy with the amount of money you might have to pay to get one of these for yourself.

    Looking over to the left side first and there’s a pin hole to open the tray which comes out to hold both the Nano SIM card and the MicroSD card. This supports up to 400GB in storage. Great if you want to keep plenty of photos, videos, music as well as documents and apps in your hand and not run out of space.

    Some markets have a dual-SIM version of the device, however the one we got in to review is the one on sale in the UK and has the single SIM. It would have been nice to see the worldwide launch of the dual SIM model though, as many people have a personal SIM and a work one.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    Continuing the metal frame round to the right side you get all the buttons, and as expected up top is the volume up and down. You can obviously control all aspects of the volume from calls to ringtone, plus you can also use it to put the phone into ‘Do not Disturb’ mode, turning off all ringing and vibrating options making your phone silent.

    Below these come two buttons, the top being for turning the phone on and off or putting into standby mode with a quick tap.  Then comes the button not found on many other devices, this has a slightly different design to it with a textured edge so you can feel it is different from the others.

    You can assign this special ‘Convenience Key’ for up to three options in the settings, these can be to send a message, open an app or select from a wide range of pre-installed shortcuts like checking data use, turning on the torch, set an alarm etc…

    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    Flipping over to the top is where things get a bit different with the design, instead of having the same metal band all the way around, the top of the device has a plastic material with a single hole for a microphone to help with noise cancellation.

    I would also go as far as to say the reason for this design change was to help with signal quality, something the Motion hangs on to very well and I often got stronger 4G signal on this device than I did when comparing to others I was testing.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    Finally moving down to the bottom is where the design gets back on track, keeping the metal frame design from the sides. This is also where you find the 3.5m headset port (yes, thankfully there is one still there for people who have not moved into the Bluetooth setup yet).

    Next to the headset port is where you see a little hole again. This is for recording audio and for voice calls. These are clear and loud with HD Voice supported on certain networks. You also get the – what now seems standard on new devices – a USB C port for quick charging or for data transfer.

    USB C may be new to a lot of people, and this might be the first device you buy with it, but there is no getting away from the change. This is the new standard and it is here to stay. Plus it does add some benefits, even if it just allowing reversible plugging in, so no more breaking your chargers.

    Next to the USB C port is the loudspeaker, and as with the normal speaker, quality is loud and clear. If you use it for calls such as conference calling then both ends of the conversation will be clear and good quality.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    Turn over to the back and you get a pretty good-looking design, from the plastic top part (housing the camera and single LED flash), to the carbon-looking material on the back. This adds grip and features the iconic BlackBerry logo again, this time in shiny silver near the middle.

    The reason for the plastic top part of the back (which continues to the top as mentioned earlier) is to improve signal quality and the antenna will be located near here to maximise the best signal strength possible.

    Cameras

    The camera is an area that BlackBerry have never really been known for standing out in. It’ always been this way since the early BlackBerry days and has been the same even on their more recent Android-powered devices.

    The BlackBerry Motion features a single camera on the back at 12 megapixels with an f2.0 aperture. This is quite high considering f1.8 seems to be widely available and devices now even packing f1.6 lenses.

    If I have confused you with what f2.0 is, it’s basically is the amount of light that the camera lens lets in when capturing an image, the lower the number the better low light performance you get and most decent mobile phone cameras these days are around the f1.8 mark.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    When taking photos in daylight you get a pretty decent photo for sharing on social media or sending off an email quickly, but you would not want to take it on holiday and you would absolutely not take it on a night out to capture what you got up to after a few drinks.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    When you load the camera (which does open pretty fast) you have a left and right bar down the sides with the image in the middle, pretty standard.

    Looking at the left side first, up top is the ‘gear’ icon which opens up the settings such as photo/video resolution, face detection, video stabilisation and more. Below this is where you turn on or off HDR for high dynamic range photos, having this on sometimes helps improve overall quality by playing around with the shadows and lighting.

    Then you get the size of the photo and there are three options, the normal 16:9 most people will want to use, especially when printing photos if you want too, however you do also get the 4:3 ratio and, if you love Instagram, there is also the 1:1 square format here.

    Timer and Flash modes are the only options left on the left hand side, giving a delay of either 0 seconds, 3 seconds or 10 seconds in case you want to get in the photo yourself.

    Looking at the right side you get quite a few filter effects. You can add to your photo when taking it. Some are good and some will never get used. This is down to your own eye and what type of photo you want to capture.

    Pressing ‘Mode’ allows you to pick from a Scanner, Slow-Mo, Video, Pano and normal Photo modes, all pretty self-explanatory and easily switched with two simple taps.

    Below this is the large round shutter button for capturing photos or starting/stopping video recordings. You can also switch between front and rear cameras at the bottom.

    When you’re in any of the camera modes you get a brightness slider on the screen so you can manually adjust the brightness either up or down depending on your lighting and surroundings.

    If you are a keen camera fan you might want to explore all the manual settings. Thankfully these are available and can be switched on in the first settings panel, changing the control mode from Auto to Manual. This gives you access to shutter speed, brightness, contrast and more.

    Below are some examples, taking in all different locations and conditions. You can see a real world test of what you can expect to get out of this device.

    Performance and battery

    Performance is a mixed bag of specifications. On one hand the Snapdragon 635 Octacore processor may not be the most impressive on paper. However, the large 4000mAh battery and the 4GB of RAM makes up for that shortfall. Considering you will not want the Motion for hardcore gaming titles, the huge battery paired with the more power friendly processor does maximise power performance, and this phone feels like it will never run out of battery.

    In my time using the BlackBerry Motion, which was about 3 weeks in total, I found performance to be very good for most tasks. Loading normal daily apps like email, social media and multimedia caused no issues at all, often loading up very fast.

    Things start to slow a little when it comes to gaming. I use Pokemon Go (don’t judge me too much) and I found this sometimes it stuttered a little, but this was the same with the more-expensive BlackBerry KeyOne. As mentioned before, anyone looking to purchase a BlackBerry will usually be looking for great battery, superb software experience as well as security. The decision doesn’t tend to be based on whether they can catch Pikachu.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    The battery is something I cannot recommend highly enough, the BlackBerry Motion really is a workhorse. When it comes to keeping the phone powered on, day and night whilst using my Three UK SIM (connected to 4G most of the time) and WiFi at home, after 6 hours of running off the battery I still had 84% left. That meant an estimated time left of a whopping 3 days!

    Adding some video playback and camera use will of course change this stat, but even saying that, battery saving mode was switched off so if you wanted you could stretch it even further.

    Software

    Software is a big area for BlackBerry, especially when it comes to security. They also have to make sure anyone owing one can have fun whilst staying safe.

    When it comes to custom software, there are quite a few custom applications installed out of the box to help you protect all your data with ease.

    DTEK by BlackBerry is the main area to look for. This handy app will guide you through what your overall security status is, from encryption, security patch date as well as screen locks and factory reset protection plus a huge amount more.

    The company have also installed some other handy applications such as a decent File manager, Notes, Power Manager and a handy Locker app which lets you lock files and folders away under a password so no one can get hands on your key, even confidential data.

    However, one of the best additions by the company is called ‘Privacy Shade’, which lets you stop anyone snooping over your shoulder. This will prevent them spotting what you have on your screen, especially handy when it comes to passwords or bank details.

    Once switched on you get all the same screens you did before but much darker, almost blacked out, only with a small rectangle in the middle with a small ‘eye’ icon.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    Pressing and holding this ‘eye’ reveals only the information that is between the bars on the screen, and these can be adjusted to different heights if you wish.

    If you want to be even more secure, in the settings you can change the bars to a small spy glass like option so you can just show the small area you want as seen above.

    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review
    BlackBerry Motion   Review

    Other software tweaks include a massive selection of widgets for your options, ranging from adding an icon to texting a particular person from your contacts with a single tap. You can also do more simple things, like turning on the torch if you wanted quick access to do that.

    The biggest part of the ‘BlackBerry Launcher’ experience comes in the form of the ‘Hub’ which is a single messaging app that builds in quick access to all your email and social media in one single location. This allows you to personalise and sort without switching apps.

    This is all very handy, especially for someone with two email accounts, a Twitter account, my personal Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp all full of messages – the Hub lets you quickly sort them, delete them and just keep your phone clean and tidy.

    Having over 200 messages split over multiple apps is not easy to manage, however once I went into the Hub and went to the View All tab, I was quickly reading, replying and deleting messages trimming that amount down. Not only that but it was a lot less stressful than loading four or five apps at a time to do it that way.

    Conclusion

    When it comes to your traditional ‘BlackBerry’ device, many people still have the perception of a business-only phone with a physical keyboard running a secure email system. In fact, the company has moved on.

    Given the lower powered Snapdragon 635 processor used, and the older Android 7.1 version of the software, you might – on paper – be concerned about what the BlackBerry Motion has going for it.

    Thankfully the BlackBerry Motion does have some great things to point out which make it a great value phone. There’s 4GB of RAM to make your apps fly and, whilst you won’t be wanting to play the most graphic-intensive games, it does also have that massive 4000mAh battery which gets you through your day, and then some.

    At £399.99 at time of writing this review, the Motion is a great option to those BlackBerry fans who love the brand, want the security that the company pride themselves on, but do not want to use a full physical keyboard. Instead, like many other Android phones, there’s the excellent touch screen keyboard.

    If you are in the market for an affordable Android powered smartphone with a huge battery, great email support, plenty of RAM and expandable storage; the BlackBerry Motion might be the one for you. Thanks also to the key OS additions such as the privacy shade and that in-built security.

    And to top it all off…. the BlackBerry Motion is indeed splash proof with an IP67 rating. Whilst you won’t want to take it swimming, you have no fear of using it in the rain.

    At present no UK network has signed up to range the BlackBerry Motion direct, you can however purchase at a wide range of online stores (such as Currys) SIM Free, and via Carphone Warehouse on network contracts to bring the price down.

    A big thank you to TCL for providing the BlackBerry Motion for us to review.

    The post BlackBerry Motion – Review is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

  • OnePlus Pushing OxygenOS 4.7.6 to 5T

    OnePlus this week began distributing the OxygenOS 4.7.6 system update to its OnePlus 5T flagship handset. The update targets camera and system performance. For example, OnePlus says OxygenOS 4.7.6 provides stability and clarity improvements to the camera, particularly when taking selfies in low light. The camera should also work better with third-party camera apps (think Facebook and Instagram). On the system front, the latest software build introduces assistive lighting for face unlock, improves screenshot and WiFi behavior, and installs the December security patch. OnePlus says the update is rolling out over the next week or so. In other OnePlus news, the company has committed to bringing the 5T’s face unlock feature to its mid-2017 flagship phone, the OnePlus 5. Moreover, both the 5T and 5 will soon see the Android 8 Oreo update.

    Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

    Apple Crippling Old iPhones: Apology Won't Stop Lawsuits

    In a rare public apology, Apple yesterday said it was sorry for how it handled an operating system upgrade that slows the performance of older iPhones to prevent them from unexpectedly shutting down due to aging batteries. Apple also said it would lower the price for iPhone battery replacements, and add new features to iOS to provide greater transparency into battery health.

    However, that response doesn’t appear likely to save Apple from user lawsuits over the operating system fix, which intentionally slows down processors and other components to dynamically manage device power usage. To date, 15 class action lawsuits have been filed against Apple alleging misrepresentation, breach of good faith, and deceptive business practices.

    Apple’s latest troubles began coming to a boil earlier this month after a Reddit user described problems with a slow iPhone 6s and traced the problem to the device’s aging battery. Upon checking the phone using the processor benchmarking service Geekbench, the user discovered the device’s CPU was significantly slower with the old battery.

    ‘Some of You Feel Apple Has Let You Down’

    After the Reddit post was published, Apple acknowledged that its 2016 release of iOS 10.2.1 added a feature designed to smooth out peak power demands in the iPhone 6, iPhone 6s and iPhone SE by slowing down processor performance. It added that it had also extended that feature to the iPhone 7 with this year’s release of iOS 11.2, and planned to “add support for other products in the future.”

    The revelation led to numerous complaints from iPhone users that Apple was deliberately throttling their devices without informing them why or giving them the ability to opt out. Some also expressed concern that the strategy looked like planned obsolescence intended to drive users to replace aging devices with new iPhones.

    “We’ve been hearing feedback…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Yale Students Create Plug-In To Combat Fake News

    A team of college students is getting attention from internet companies and Congress after developing a browser extension that alerts users to fake and biased news stories and helps guide them to more balanced coverage.

    The plug-in, “Open Mind,” was developed earlier this month during a 36-hour problem-solving competition known as a hackathon at Yale University.

    The winning team was comprised of four students: Michael Lopez-Brau and Stefan Uddenberg, both doctoral students in Yale’s psychology department; Alex Cui, an undergraduate who studies machine learning at the California Institute of Technology; and Jeff An, who studies computer science at the University of Waterloo and business at Wilfrid Laurier University in Ontario.

    That team competed against others to win a challenge from Yale’s Poynter Fellowship in Journalism, which asked students to find a way to counter fake news.

    The team’s software, designed as an extension for Google’s Chrome browser, will display a warning screen when someone enters a site known to disseminate fake news. It also will alert a reader if a story shared on social media is fake or biased.

    But it does much more than just warn.

    The plug-in uses existing sentiment analysis technology to analyze any story that might appear in a newsfeed, identifying the major players and any political slant. It then can suggest to the reader other stories on the same topic that have an alternate viewpoint.

    “So let’s say there is an article that is very pro-Trump on a topic,” said An. “We would then try to give you something more left of center. We can go out and find for you that alternative article.”

    The extension also collects browsing data and can show a user a graph that indicates whether they have been reading stories from just one side of a political spectrum. It curates a news feed for that user, showing alternative…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Can Technology Support Mental Health at Work?

    Imagine stepping into the break room in the office and instead of making yourself some coffee and complaining about work, you put on a virtual reality (VR) headset and listen to the voice of a therapist guide you through a meditation session with the aim of transporting you to a calming place far away.

    Whether the experience would have the desired effect is debatable — and there’s growing awareness of the potential downsides to mindfulness, but this form of therapy is part of a brave new world of office-based tech designed to support wellbeing at work. VR technology previously only used by psychotherapists to treat clients is now being sold to corporate human resources departments.

    Businesses in Spain have started to sign up Psious, a VR and augmented reality (AR) technology company which has developed ways to use VR and AR to help mental health and behavioral issues from phobias to anxiety disorders.

    “We initially launched Psious to provide exposure therapy; you can use AR to show spiders to someone who is afraid of them, for example, without having to show them real ones or rely on imagination,” says Xavier Palomer, the Madrid-based company’s chief executive.

    Palomer, who has a background in bio-engineering, came up with the idea for the business four years ago while chatting to a friend who had a fear of flying. He realized that the relaxation techniques his friend had developed with a psychologist, alongside exposure therapy tools, could have a wider appeal. “It can be used to help people calm their nerves, relax, become better speakers, all useful things,” he says.

    Palomer says he tapped into a trend as clients were already introducing mindfulness programs at the office and so were ready to embrace the idea. As the technology has become cheaper and more accessible, possibilities have opened up. Other…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Inside Facebook's Messenger Kids: Do Parents Have Enough Control?

    Loren Cheng knows firsthand how Facebook’s conversations with parents shaped the creation of its first messaging app for kids. As a product management director for the tech firm, he helped guide the team that developed Messenger Kids — an app that allows children under 13 years old to send texts, images and videos to friends and relatives that their parents approve.


    “One of the things that we noticed is that kids are getting devices younger and younger,” said Cheng, who is also a father of three children.


    Released this month in the United States, Messenger Kids drew mixed reactions. Some thought Facebook built the app in a way that gave parents enough control while others still worry about privacy and cyberbullying.


    Cheng recently sat down with this news organization to talk about the origins of Messenger Kids and addressed some of the privacy concerns. This interview has been edited for clarity and length.


    Q: What did Facebook learn from its conversations with parents?


    A: Parents really want their kids to be socializing and connected with others, whether that’s family members or other kids. One of the things they wondered about was if there’s some way technology can play a role. On the flip side, they’re also super concerned. Parents have grown up in a certain generation, and they think they understand technology pretty well. But the technology is changing so quickly that they worry about how their kids are using it.


    Q: What was your role as a product management director in the development of Messenger Kids?


    A: Product managers make sure a decision is made. Especially with a product like Messenger Kids, the team really took it seriously. There were a lot of strong opinions about how it should be built. That can make it harder to make decisions sometimes because everyone feels really convicted about…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today