Microsoft Disabling Notifications for Windows Phone 7.5 and 8

Microsoft says devices running Windows Phone 7.5 and 8.0 have reached end-of-life status and will no longer be supported. Beginning February 20, Microsoft will turn off push notification services for Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 8.0. This means devices running those platforms will no longer receive notifications, will not receive live tile updates, and will not be able to use Find My Phone to locate the device. Microsoft says Windows Phone 8.1 and Windows 10 Mobile remain fully supported for the time being. Devices running Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 8.0 were originally sold in the 2011 and 2012 timeframe.

Source: Phone Scoop – Latest News

Coolsmartphone Podcast 222 Porgi Intervention

Another week, another published edited podcast. The Porgs are doing a mighty fine job, even while I vacation in the United States of America (#murica).

We apologise in advance for the audio quality, at this point we were still learning what a microphone is and left the poor Podcast Editing Porgs with the tough job of making the episode audible.

We get better from episode 223. Honestly, we aim to please.

The post Coolsmartphone Podcast 222 Porgi Intervention is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

Facebook

  • Google+
  • RSS Feed
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Podcast


    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

  • EE Hawk – Review

    The Introduction

    I’ve said it many times in the past. These days you don’t need to spend a fortune to get some great hardware specs, and this is even more true when it comes to some network-branded devices.

    The EE Hawk is the networks’ latest branded handset, and whilst the screen or camera will not blow you away, getting an LTE-Advanced smartphone with speeds up to 300Mbps for just £150 on PAYG or from £12.99 on a contract, is unheard of before now.

    EE were kind enough to send over a device for us to test out and, as well as checking out the super-fast speeds, we also went ahead and checked the other parts that make it…you know…. an actual phone.

    Check on for all the details on the new EE Hawk.

    EE Hawk   Review


    Design and display

    The design of a phone is what grabs your attention and gets you interested when you’re in a shop full of different devices. Most phones these days look pretty much the same on the front.

    Here the Gorilla Glass back and front, plus the sturdy frame, should make the EE Hawk quite a hefty device. However, at just 133g it is actually quite light and good looking at the same time.

    EE Hawk   Review

    From the front you have an 8 megapixel selfie camera which is decent enough for apps such as Snapchat or Instagram, but not really cut out for vlogging and making videos on the move.

    There is no dedicated front camera flash, but with the screen bright enough this helps boost brightness just enough for the odd lower-light photo here or there.

    EE Hawk   Review

    The display is a 5 inch LCD panel with a resolution of 1280 x 720 and just 294ppi. That’s obviously not as hi-res as some of the more expensive devices, but ignoring the numbers and looking at the experience, is it good enough? Well,the display is sadly one of the downfalls of the device, colours look washed out and with any type of game, you really do notice the poor quality – especially on something like Pokemon Go (which I use as reference a few times).

    Below the screen is where you find the rather large ‘chin’ bezel. There’s no buttons in sight as the Hawk does all the navigation on the display.

    EE Hawk   Review

    To navigate your way around the screen there’s the left button to go back a screen and the home button to take you back to the main screen. The button on the right will open the multitasking so you can switch between apps and then close any you do not need left open.

    EE Hawk   Review

    The Hawk does have a nice feel to it, this is thanks to the well built frame surrounding that Gorilla Glass on the front and back.

    The handset is especially good for the price and at least you get a premium feeling smartphone for your money.

    EE Hawk   Review

    Looking over to the right side there’s the volume up and down keys. These will. of course, be the same as any other Android phone. Below that is the power key also used to put the phone into standby mode.

    EE Hawk   Review

    Looking up top you have just one port, but thankfully it’s that all important 3.5m headset jack which means you can use standard headset of your choice in case you did not want to use Bluetooth yet.

    Whilst many phones now are moving away from having a headset port for listening to music, at least the Hawk held off on leaving it out, at least until the next flagship they decide to pair with.

    Something nice to see was a rather premium pair of JBL headphones included in the box. These came with a very long cable, this means you can leave the phone in your pocket and still listen to music without stretching the cable

    EE Hawk   Review

    Finally moving down to the bottom you get a USB-C charging port with speakers either side which produce reasonable quality sound for most situations, the audio is loud and clear enough without being too harsh.

    It looks like USB-C is quickly becoming more and more common on smartphones, and thankfully the EE Hawk decided to go with the times and use this new standard, especially as it allows the connector to be plugged in either way (no more broken USB cables).

    EE Hawk   Review

    Turn over to the back and you get a rear facing 13 megapixel camera with dual LED flash. Use this flash for photos or as a torch with the quick launch system on the notification panel.

    Below that is the fingerprint reader used to unlock the device or for using Android Pay to purchase items in stores that take contactless payments.

    The rest of the back is a piece of Gorilla Glass which makes it extra tough and more resistant to breaking. It also shows off the EE logo.

    Cameras

    When it comes to the camera, unfortunately the EE Hawk is a bit of a letdown in a few areas. Whilst the Hawk does pack a 13 megapixel lens into the device, the overall quality is quite poor, and the software does nothing to improve anything, plus the HDR mode seems to take quite a while to capture anything.

    There is a dual LED flash on the back which can be used in low light conditions to help boost the light somewhat, but most people will end up using this as a flashlight instead as the camera really is not impressive.

    EE Hawk   Review

    When I say the camera is poor, this is not just limited to low light conditions which many other phones struggle with.  Let’s not forget that even at the top end of the market those low-light shots can suffer. Here the quality is rather poor on outdoor shots too, especially with the brightness and contrast captured, although there is quite a lot of detail in some of the close-up examples, which was good to see.

    EE Hawk   Review

    When you load the camera (which happens quite slowly I must say) you get a screen many of you will be familiar with if you have owned an Android phone in the past.

    On the left side you have different options to change the camera mode including Panorama etc. There is a row of icons along the top showing you options such as HDR mode, flash, video stabilisation as well as rotating the camera between front and back.

    Looking at the right side you get up top the small square sample photo you last took which, if pressed, takes you to the gallery to browse all your photos and videos.

    Below this you find a large area used to either take a photo or to capture a video depending on what you want to do at the time.

    Looking below the capture buttons, you have a gear icon which is used to open the settings area and change the resolution, storage location and a wide range of other settings.

    Below are some examples, taken in different locations and conditions. You can see a real world test of what you can expect to get out of this device.

    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review

    Performance and battery

    Performance is, as expected for a £150 smartphone, rather limited thanks to the MediaTek processor used and just 2GB of RAM. You really should not expect too much from it.

    The battery seems a rather small on paper – 2500mAh, but when you add in the slower processor and low resolution screen, most people will manage to get through a day of normal use, unless you start pushing the limits with gaming, multimedia or camera use of course.

    Whilst general apps like social media or music players will run fine, trying to play games really started to slow things down and Pokemon Go became very frustrating with both performance and low resolution display causing problems for me.

    This was not the only app which caused concern, some other games stumbled. Even with nothing else running. Anything which uses a lot of RAM will also be a no go.

    Whilst some might say I am too used to high end devices, the fact Pokemon Go was a stuttering mess most of the time will be concern to anyone as that game is played by all ages.

    Software

    EE have tried to keep the Android experiance as close to ‘stock’ as possible. The non-standard apps included the MyEE app for tracking your allowances and bills and the Lookout security app used for keeping your device as secure as possible.

    The benefits of this should mean quicker updates to newer versions of Android, but we are yet to hear when or even if the Hawk will get the Android 8 update and how it will perform on the hardware here.

    Thankfully EE seem support VoLTE and WiFi Calling out of the box, so customers can stay connected even in places with little to no signal. The WiFi Calling also supports SMS too, so you won’t miss out on that all important message.

    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review
    EE Hawk   Review

    During my time with the EE Hawk I was running on Android 7.0 with November security patch. This should have hopefully been updated by now, especially with security being a key concern for many smartphone customers.

    Of course if you do not like the look of the home screen, the Play Store is full of third party launchers so you can customise to whichever one you like best, even the most popular one – Nova Launcher – looks good running on this device and offers lots of options to personalise.

    Conclusion

    EE try to offer the best experience possible with all their devices ranged on their network. When they decide to give their name to an actual device, they need to be sure it is a great experience and worth the money.

    When it comes to the overall package of the EE Hawk, the key stand out feature is of course the great network support. They offer near 300Mbps speeds on a phone costing from just £15 a month. The Hawk does indeed have some impressive network speeds thanks to EE.

    Where the experience lacks is on the processing front, with a sluggish MediaTek MT6750 processor and just 2GB of RAM to run all those applications you might have installed.

    But it is not the sluggish performance of the processor that makes the Hawk hard to enjoy as much as some others. Instead it’s the camera performance and screen quality, which I am afraid to say is very disappointing.

    Anyone reading may be shouting, “The phone is just £150 so what do you expect?” In reality for just a little more money, there are other better mid-range phones out there if you look hard enough.

    If network performance is your main criteria, and you like the EE network as a whole, then the EE Hawk is a good buy, especially because of that insane network speeds you can get. If you are looking for a mid-range phone to play some games on and take photos when out and about, the battery, screen and camera will disappoint you.

    Hopefully in their next own branded device, EE can look at addressing these concerns and making the future branded smartphone a great ‘all-round’ winner.

    Comparing other network branded devices on sale, the Vodafone Smart V8 stands out in nearly every key category from screen, battery, camera, performance and build quality, and for just £15 up front more.

    However with that being said, the EE network performance is most areas is fantastic, and with Cat6 speeds available in many locations, for now at least, EE clinch the network category with the Hawk.

    A big thank you to EE for sending us the EE Hawk to review.

    The post EE Hawk – Review is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

    Facebook

  • Google+
  • RSS Feed
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Podcast


    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

  • Samsung Galaxy S9 – The leaks continue!

    Remember how the esteemed leaker, Evan Blass, told everyone that he was going to retire? Yeah, well… that didn’t happen, and his leaks continue to be rock solid, year after year.

    We’ve already had lots of specs being leaked, but now there’s clearer shots of both the Galaxy S9 and the S9+.

    Short version, they’re going to be expensive and there’s going to be an S9 with a 5.8″ screen and an S9+ with a 6.2″ panel. The focus this year appears to be on the camera technology, and we’ve got snaps of the rear shooters this time. Both devices are said to feature variable aperture 12-megapixel cameras. This is a clever mechanical tweak that lets you go from f/2.4 to f/1.5.

    We’ll be on site this coming Sunday to bring you all the latest information, so don’t go anywhere folks 🙂 Follow us on Twitter!

    Samsung Galaxy S9   The leaks continue!

    Samsung Galaxy S9   The leaks continue!

    The post Samsung Galaxy S9 – The leaks continue! is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

    Facebook

  • Google+
  • RSS Feed
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Podcast


    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

  • Want better coverage? Go to church.

    Want better coverage? Go to church.

    Getting coverage into rural areas is a constant challenge for the networks. We’ve seen EE using an innovative home-broadband solution for rural homes and Vodafone have their Sure Signal kit plus new mini masts. However, the problem with planning permission and fierce opposition to unsightly large masts in communities continues, as does the cost of getting and renting land to put the masts on.

    Today the Church of England, which has the third-largest rural estate in the country, have reached an agreement with the government here in the UK. The “accord” encourages churches to sign up to improve connectivity in rural areas. A new standard contract can be used for churches hosting mobile and and broadband equipment. More than 100 churches are currently being used to house mobile phone masts, however there’s more than 16,000 church buildings in this agreement.

    Ofcom recently announced that 82% of homes in rural areas do not receive a 4G signal from any of the major phone networks.

    Sounds like a win-win to us, especially when you consider how many schools have masts on their buildings. The local community benefits, and the churches receive a regular income from the mobile operators who put their kit into bell towers etc.

    Want better coverage? Go to church.

    Masts are rarely this obvious on churches

    As we’ve seen many years ago, networks can hide their masts in flag and telegraph poles – even in petrol station signs. You might not think that there’s one in your local area, but it could be in the lamppost or tree by your home, and it’s now even more difficult to find your local mast as networks aren’t required to release maps.

    If you want to have a look at how these antennas are hidden into church spires, this page could be of interest. A lot of the time, you won’t even know that they’re there.

    The post Want better coverage? Go to church. is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

    Facebook

  • Google+
  • RSS Feed
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Podcast


    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

  • Intel Expands Bug Bounty To Catch More Spectre-Like Flaws

    Intel is hoping the spectre of more bounties might lead to fewer meltdowns in the area of semiconductor security. The chip giant said Thursday that it is opening up its bug bounty program to the public in the hopes that by casting a wider net, it will have better luck in catching security flaws in its chips such as the recently found Spectre and Meltdown bugs.

    Those flaws, which became public in January, are said to have had the potential to affect every PC and mobile device in the world.

    In a blog post, Rick Echevarria, Intel’s vice president and general manager of platform security, said the main changes in the bug bounty program include moving it from invitation only, to opening it to all security researchers, and offering a new program that runs until Dec. 31, 2018 that will pay up to $250,000 for the finding of “side channel vulnerabilities,” or the types of flaws similar to Spectre.

    Additionally, Intel is raising bounties across the board up to $100,000.

    “We believe these changes will enable us to more broadly engage the security research community, and provide better incentives for coordinated response and disclosure that help protect our customers and their data,” Echevarria said in his blog post.

    Echevarria added that the bounty program will “evolve” as it becomes necessary to make it more effective over time. The company has said it doesn’t expect to have security patches and other measures to address the entirety of the Spectre and Meltdown flaws until this fall.
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Honor 9 Lite – Video review

    Honor 9 Lite   Video review
    This morning I had a bit of a rant about this phone, and I’ll tell you why.

    I’ve been in this business since 2002. For years I’ve reviewed the “top-end” phones and a smattering of “budget Android handsets”. The latter, and let’s not beat about the bush, are generally rubbish.

    The budget Android phones we get to see here usually have a problem somewhere. They’ll perhaps cost between £120 and £200 and either have a crappy low-resolution screen, an appalling camera, awful build-quality (plastic-fantastic creaking etc) or they will be as slow as heck thanks to a terrible processor or simply not enough RAM.

    Honor 9 Lite   Video review

    Here, though, I’ve been bowled over. This thing is £199.99 from Honor.com and I don’t even think it deserves the word “Lite”.

    It’s not “Lite”.

    It’sactually very bloody good. It delivers in spades and, OK, where they’ve had to trim some corners to fit it into the sub-£200 price bracket, they’ve done it in areas that make sense and won’t really affect daily operation.

    You get the very latest Android 8.0, you get a beautiful 5.65″ screen with a 2160x1080p resolution screen packing 428PPI. It’s a lengthy 18:9 too, and that Huawei Kirin 659 CPU (which is octa-Core with 4 x 2.36 GHz and 4 x 1.7 GHz) zips along. The double dual-camera arrangement (13 megapixel and 2 megapixel on both sides) produces gorgeous shots and it still gets NFC, WiFi, GPS, 4G, Bluetooth and everything else you’d expect from a phone costing three times more.

    So, well, what can I say. This is highly recommended from me. It’s available to buy from the Honor store. Don’t forget to checkout my camera comparison piece and the up-close photos of the phone too.

    Yes, yes, you can pick flies and mention the microUSB charging port or whatever but come on. It’s simply brilliant for the money. Brilliant. Brilliant.

    The post Honor 9 Lite – Video review is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

    Facebook

  • Google+
  • RSS Feed
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Podcast


    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

  • Magic Leap and the NBA Aim To Change How We Watch Basketball

    Last fall, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said that he wanted to change the way people watch basketball. Specifically, he wanted to make it more interactive – like a video game – with live stats or social media commentary posted right alongside the game.

    The NBA has found at least one technology partner to share in the idea: Magic Leap, the highly anticipated augmented reality startup set to launch its first pair of glasses this year, is now partnering with the NBA and its broadcast partner Turner, the companies announced Tuesday at Recode’s Code Media conference in Huntington Beach, Calif.

    The arrangement means that users will be able to watch some NBA content, like classic games or highlights, once Magic Leap launches its AR headset. People wearing the glasses will be able to see multiple screens overlaid onto the real world, “pin” those screens to a wall like a giant movie projector, or watch them as they walk around. You could watch an NBA basketball game on one screen, for example, while getting live stats or social media updates on another.

    You won’t be able to watch live NBA games with Magic Leap at launch, though that could change. The hope is that someday, you might watch an NBA game play out in 3-D right on your dining room table.

    “Eventually, the game could be available streaming on your coffee table as though you were a giant looking into the arena from above,” said Jeff Marsilio, the NBA’s senior vice president of global media distribution. “Those are some ideas, those are things that we’re working towards. [They’re] not quite ready but actually more possible than you might think.”

    For the NBA, working with Magic Leap doesn’t have a lot of downsides. Because of the broad decline in TV viewership, pro sports leagues like the NBA have…
    Source: Mobile Tech Today

    Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9

    Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9

    Honor 9 Lite on the left and right, the Honor 9

    We’re lucky enough to have an Honor 9 and an Honor 9 Lite, so we figured a big batch of comparison photos was definitely worth showing. They’re both blue (here at least, you can get the 9 Lite in grey too) and they’re both shiny, but which is best for you?

    The Honor 9, on the right in these comparison shots, has some “battle damage” as this has been my device of choice for the past few months (despite it not wanting to work with Strava). It measures in at 147.3 x 70.9 x 7.5 mm and weighs 155 g. The P9 Lite, on the other hand, is a little lighter at 149 g and is a touch longer and wide at 151 x 71.9 x 7.6 mm. There’s also 0.1 mm of extra thickness but you’ll never notice that.

    Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9

    Perhaps the most obvious difference is the screen and fingerprint arrangement. On the P9 the fingerprint sensor is built into that multi-use home button. The P9 has a 5.15″ screen at 1080 x 1920 pixels in a 16:9 ratio, whereas the P9 Lite puts the fingerprint sensor on the back but you can still do the swish navigation tricks on-screen with this one. The screen is a larger 5.65″ unit with a higher resolution – 1080 x 2160 pixels – and it has an 18:9 ratio.Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9

    The Honor 9 should be getting Oreo any day now, but the 9 Lite gets this out of the box. Processor-wise, the Honor 9 has a HiSilicon Kirin 960 CPU. This is an octa-core (4×2.4 GHz Cortex-A73 and 4×1.8 GHz Cortex-A53). The P9 Lite gets a HiSilicon Kirin 659 CPU, which is almost the same – it has an octa-core (4×2.36 GHz Cortex-A53 and 4×1.7 GHz Cortex-A53). However, memory is vastly different. Both of these are the UK market spec, and I’ve got 6GB of RAM in the Honor 9 with 64GB of internal storage. The Honor 9 Lite gets 3GB of RAM and 32GB of internal storage, so half. However, you can whack in a microSD card into both.

    Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9
    Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9

    Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9

    The Honor 9 has a dual 12 megapixel (f/2.2, 27mm) and a 20 megapixel (f/2.2, 27mm) shooter which includes phase detection autofocus, 2x lossless zoom and dual-LED dual-tone flash. Up front is an 8 megapixel cam. On the Honor 9 Lite, you get this four-camera arrangement. There’s a dual 13 megapixel and 2 megapixel shooters featuring phase detection autofocus and LED flash. Up front, a 13 megapixel and 2 megapixel arrangement. We’ll be bringing you some camera comparisons soon.

    Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9

    The Honor 9 and Honor 9 Lite both have NFC, 3.5mm jack, GPS, Bluetooth 4.2 and similar batteries (3200mAh in the Honor 9, 3000mAh in the Honor 9 Lite), however the USB-C on the older Honor 9 gets dropped in favour of a microUSB port on the Honor 9 Lite. Another difference is the fact that the Honor 9 does 5GHz WiFi but the Honor 9 Lite does not.

    Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9

    Price-wise, the Honor 9 will set you back £349.99 from the official UK store whereas the Honor 9 Lite will cost a mere £199.99!

    We’ll have comparison shots from the cameras and a full review online very soon, so stay tuned!

    Until then, here’s some shots of the Honor 9 Lite alone..

    Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9

    Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9 Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9 Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9 Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9 Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9 Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9

    The post Honor 9 Lite vs Honor 9 is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

    Facebook

  • Google+
  • RSS Feed
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Podcast


    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News

  • Wrappz cases. Half price!

    Wrappz cases. Half price!
    Way back in 2013, when I was still at school (ahem..), we covered Wrappz.com. They do personalised covers and skins for your phone.

    This weekend, and only this weekend, they’re reducing the prices of their cases by 50% if you put in the code 4EVER.

    It’s simple to order. Just head to their cases, choose a case type, then choose your phone, then make it your own by adding images and designs. Boom, done.

    As a rough idea on pricing, the Galaxy S7 cases are £14.95, so this weekend you can take 50% off that if you use the code. That means £7.48 off. You still have to add the £2.95 postage, but hey, with your own personal touch you’re gonna be getting a case that looks like no other.

    The post Wrappz cases. Half price! is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

    Facebook

  • Google+
  • RSS Feed
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Podcast


    Source: CoolSmartPhone.com News